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I've been testing out sqlite3 types for efficiency on a mobile app but I'm getting strange behavior.

I created a table this way:

create table numeric_t(int_4 INTEGER(4), int_8 INTEGER(8), real_4 REAL(4), real_8 REAL(8), new_real DOUBLE, int_1 INTEGER(1));

And am setting values and seing which rows show how many decimals and so on...

Was I wrong to assume that:
- the INTEGER columns should not be able to store numbers with decimals?
- the INTEGER(1), INTEGER(4) and REAL(4) should not be able to store as many decimal places as the others?

Thanks

Check out this snapshot of my results:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/30415492/sqlite_snap.png

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In SQLite, column types do not restrict data types:

> CREATE TABLE t(i INTEGER);
> INSERT INTO T VALUES(1);
> INSERT INTO T VALUES(1.23);
> INSERT INTO T VALUES('forty-two');
> SELECT typeof(i) FROM t;
integer
real
text

To quote the documentation:

SQLite uses a more general dynamic type system. In SQLite, the datatype of a value is associated with the value itself, not with its container.
[...]
Any column ... may be used to store a value of any storage class.

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So when creating an sqlite table, INTEGER(1) or INTEGER(10) will have the same memory footprint and performance when written to/read from? –  glesage Jun 24 '13 at 18:52
    
Yes. Space and performance depend on the actual values. –  CL. Jun 24 '13 at 20:29
    
Alright thanks alot, I'l post another question off of this one for more (: –  glesage Jun 24 '13 at 20:51
    
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