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I'm not skilled enough to figure out what part of this is tripping up in IE9. I have a game that displays a word, and when they click on a div, it animates a flipping action and displays a description related to the word.

In IE9, it loads the first words but will not animate and show the description. This is the first thing I've ever created in jquery/javascript. It's a Frankenstein's monster of a couple of different jquery libraries and some javascript.

What do I have to look into in order to get this to work?

Here's the code:

        <script src="http://www.google.com/jsapi"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript">
      // Load jQuery
      google.load("jquery", "1");   
    </script>
    <script src="js/jquery-ui-1.7.2.custom.min.js"></script>
    <script src="js/jquery.flip.min.js"></script>
    <script src="js/jquery.xml2json.js" type="text/javascript" language="javascript"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript">
    var cC = 0;
    var flashcards;
    var aCards = [];
    var totalCards = Number(0);
    var cardToggle = Boolean(false); //not Flipped to start out
    $.get('xml/den204_fc_module01.xml', function(xml) {
        var flash = $.xml2json(xml);
        flashcards = flash.card;
        for (var i = 0, len = flashcards.length; i < len; i++) {
            var tempCards = flashcards[i];
            aCards.push({
                t: tempCards.term,
                d: tempCards.def
            });

            function shuffle(array) { // from: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6274339/how-can-i-shuffle-an-array-in-javascript
                var counter = array.length, temp, index;
                while (counter > 0) {
                    index = (Math.random() * counter--) | 0;
                    temp = array[counter];
                    array[counter] = array[index];
                    array[index] = temp;
                }

                return array;
            }

            shuffle(aCards);
            totalCards = aCards.length;
            $('#containerFront').text(aCards[cC].t);
            $("#previousSet").addClass("disabled");
        }
    });
    $(document).ready(function() {
        $("#clickableCard").click(function() {
            if (cardToggle === false) {
                console.log('cardToggle is equal to false');
                cardToggle = true;
                $("#flipbox").flip({
                    direction: "tb",
                    color: "#ffd699",
                    content: "<div id='containerBack'>" + aCards[cC].d + "</div>",
                    speed: 400,
                });
            } else {
                console.log('cardToggle is equal to true');
                cardToggle = false;
                $("#flipbox").flip({
                    direction: "bt",
                    color: "#adc2d6",
                    content: "<div id='containerFront'>" + aCards[cC].t + "</div>",
                    speed: 400,
                });
            }
            return false;
        });
        $("#navi").click(function() {
            if (cardToggle === true) {
                console.log('cardToggle is equal to true');
                cardToggle = false;
                $("#flipbox").flip({
                    direction: "bt",
                    color: "#adc2d6",
                    content: "<div id='containerFront'>" + aCards[cC].t + "</div>",
                    speed: 200,
                });
            }
            if (cC === 0) {
                $("#previousSet").addClass("disabled");
            } else {
                $("#previousSet").removeClass("disabled");
            }
            if (cC == (totalCards - 1)) {
                $("#nextSet").addClass("disabled");
            } else {
                $("#nextSet").removeClass("disabled");
            }
        });
        $("#nextSet").click(function() {
            console.log(cC);
            if (cC < (totalCards - 1)) {
                ++cC;
                $('#containerFront').text(aCards[cC].t);
                $('#containerBack').text(aCards[cC].d);
            } else {
                console.log("cC is not less than or equal the total number of cards!");
            }
        });
        $("#previousSet").click(function() {
            console.log(cC);
            if (cC > 0) {
                --cC;
                $('#containerFront').text(aCards[cC].t);
                $('#containerBack').text(aCards[cC].d);
            } else {
                console.log("cC is not greater then 0!");
            }
        });
    });
    </script>
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closed as off-topic by Liam, freejosh, hjpotter92, Dave Zych, Graviton Jul 1 '13 at 6:00

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Tell us what you've tried to do, why it didn't work, and how it should work. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – freejosh, Dave Zych, Graviton
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
Remove all console.log from your code. In IE9 the console object is only alive when you're in debugging mode. –  ta-run Jun 24 '13 at 16:26
1  
please see meta.stackexchange.com/questions/125997/… –  Liam Jun 24 '13 at 16:27
1  
Why do you have Number(0) and Boolean(false)? Don’t try to make JavaScript look statically-typed, please. It doesn’t work. Also, === true is usually redundant. cardToggle === false is better written !cardToggle. –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Jun 24 '13 at 16:28
    
It's working for me just fine, with or WITHOUT console being open. what is the error? because i get new cards on every click same as in Chrome or FF –  SpYk3HH Jun 24 '13 at 16:30
    
I'm new here and I fully admit it! I'm also new to javascript. Sorry for causing confusion with my title. –  kking Jun 24 '13 at 16:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Remove or comment out the console.log statements in your code. IE chokes on them unless the console is open.

To address SpYk3HH's comments below, this comes from one of Microsoft's own blogs:

Keep in mind you will not be able to see the output unless you have the developer tools open. You can see the console output on either the Console or Script tabs. Be careful when using console for debugging. If you leave a call to the console object in your code when you move to production and you do not have the developer tools displayed you will get an error message telling you console is undefined.

share|improve this answer
1  
@SpYk3HH Did you read this answer fully? The last sentence says unless the console is open. –  Ian Jun 24 '13 at 16:29
1  
@SpYk3HH: Perhaps because you’ve had the console open. Read the whole answer. And the whole other answer too. –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Jun 24 '13 at 16:29
1  
@SpYk3HH Then you don't have console statements in your code, or you have some library/code that fills it so it doesn't fail. –  Ian Jun 24 '13 at 16:32
3  
@SpYk3HH: It doesn’t crash the browser. The script just doesn’t work. console is undefined. This is kind of well-known. I’m just going to give you the benefit of parallel-universe doubt and boot up Windows, though. –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Jun 24 '13 at 16:33
2  
commenting out the console.log did it. Thanks! –  kking Jun 24 '13 at 16:42

Remove all console.log from your code.

In IE9 the console object is only alive when you're in debugging mode.

If you do want to log stuff, you can do this,

if(console || console !== undefined){
   //log here
}
share|improve this answer
2  
@SpYk3HH It does. Stop making stuff up. console statements don't work unless the console is open in IE. If you have code that fills it so that it doesn't work, that's not the rest of the world's problem –  Ian Jun 24 '13 at 16:32
3  
@SpYk3HH It doesn't crash the browser, but script after it in the execution won't run. I really don't care what your resume says, we all have experience –  Ian Jun 24 '13 at 16:34
1  
@SpYk3HH Try opening this in IE: jsfiddle.net/A6xTk/show - do you get an alert? No. That's because the console.log statement right before it causes the execution to fail. Open up Developer Tools, refresh the page, and it works fine –  Ian Jun 24 '13 at 16:37
1  
@SpYk3HH it will work in IE10 afaik, are you looking in ie9? –  ta-run Jun 24 '13 at 16:39
2  
@SpYk3HH LIES ! if you're switching modes, make sure it's the proper standard as well. –  ta-run Jun 24 '13 at 16:40

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