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What I am actually trying to do is write a function that allows me to change the selection in a DataGridView and I would like to write one function and use it for both rows and columns. Here is a simple example that deselects everything and selects a new row or column:

private void SelectNew<T>(T collection, int index) where T : IList
{
  ClearSelection();
  collection[index].Selected = true;
}

My problem is that this does not work because it cannot be derived that .Selected() is available because this is the non-generic IList.

Using

where T : IList<DataGridViewBand>

would be nice but since DataGridViewRowCollection (and -Column-) just derive from IList this doesn't work.

In C++ I would probably use the traits idiom. Is there a way to do that in C# or is there a more idiomatic way?

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1  
Unfortunately, C# generics doesn't support any form of the traits idiom - you must use constraints which have to either be an implemented interface or base class. –  Reed Copsey Jun 24 '13 at 16:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

While it's theoretically possible to use reflection to do this; since your explicit goal is just to handle rows or columns the easiest option is to just create two overloads for the function:

private void SelectNew(DataGridViewColumnCollection collection, int index)
{
    ClearSelection();
    collection[index].Selected = true;
}

private void SelectNew(DataGridViewRowCollection collection, int index)
{
    ClearSelection();
    collection[index].Selected = true;
}

If you tried to use reflection to do this it would work, but it would be slower, less readable, and has the danger of no compile time protection; people would be able to pass in other kinds of lists that didn't have a Selected property and it would compile and just fail at runtime.

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That is my current solution but for some of the functions it leads to quite a bit of code duplication which I would like to avoid. –  Sarien Jun 24 '13 at 16:42
    
I decided to go with this. I think the duplicate code is more maintainable than the complicated solutions. –  Sarien Jun 25 '13 at 10:39

One possibility would be to use dynamic:

private void SelectNew(IList collection, int index)
{
  ClearSelection();
  ((dynamic)collection)[index].Selected = true;
}

Or:

private void SelectNew(IList collection, int index)
{
  ClearSelection();
  DataGridViewBand toSelect = ((dynamic)collection)[index];
  toSelect.Selected = true;
}

The biggest disadvantage of this is that you're losing compile-time type safety, so I wouldn't recommend this unless it prevented a significant amount of code duplication.

(The second version has a bit more compile-time type safety, at the cost of being more verbose and explicit.)

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If you have a collection that implements IEnumerable, and you know ahead of time what type of elements it contains, you can do the following:

IList<DataGridViewBand> typedCollection = collection
                                          .Cast<DataGridViewBand>()
                                          .ToList();

which would allow you to call your generic extension method:

private void SelectNew<T>(T collection, int index)
   where T : IList<DataGridViewBand>
{
  ClearSelection();
  collection[index].Selected = true;
}

typedCollection.SelectNew(1);

Edit:

If you decide you want to constrain T on IList<DataGridViewBand>, you may as well just write a method directly for that type because you gain nothing by using generics.

IList<DataGridViewBand> typedCollection = collection
                                          .Cast<DataGridViewBand>()
                                          .ToList();

private void SelectNew(IList<DataGridViewBand> collection, int index)
{
  ClearSelection();
  collection[index].Selected = true;
}

typedCollection.SelectNew(1);
share|improve this answer
1  
Then you're creating a new list and copying all of the elements within it just to access and modify one variable. Better to just use the indexer to get the one value and then cast it as appropriate. –  Servy Jun 24 '13 at 18:06
    
@Servy Correct, I want my answer to clear up confusion about generics, your solution would be better though. –  armen.shimoon Jun 24 '13 at 18:09

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