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The data to be visualized is from an experiment (T1-T8 represents different sections of the brain) and is as follows:

    [[Block1]]
              sum
       [T1,]   6
       [T2,]   6
       [T3,]   4
       [T4,]   5
       [T5,]   8
       [T6,]   9
       [T7,]   8
       [T8,]   6

    [[Block2]]
              sum
       [T1,]   3
       [T2,]   3
       [T3,]   4
       [T4,]   5
       [T5,]   4
       [T6,]   2
       [T7,]   1
       [T8,]   5

    [[Block3]]
              sum
       [T1,]   3
       [T2,]   3
       [T3,]   4
       [T4,]   2
       [T5,]   4
       [T6,]   8
       [T7,]   3
       [T8,]   1   

   [[Block4]]
              sum
       [T1,]   6
       [T2,]   5
       [T3,]   4
       [T4,]   3
       [T5,]   9
       [T6,]   8
       [T7,]   2
       [T8,]   6  

   [[Block5]]
              sum
       [T1,]   8
       [T2,]   3
       [T3,]   4
       [T4,]   5
       [T5,]   7
       [T6,]   6
       [T7,]   2
       [T8,]   2 

   [[Block6]]
              sum
       [T1,]   10
       [T2,]   9
       [T3,]   6
       [T4,]   8
       [T5,]   9
       [T6,]   4
       [T7,]   6
       [T8,]   7

and so on.. For more than 100 blocks..

I would like to visualize the data in the following way to see the overall value in each region for very block..

For one block I get a line plot as shown below:

Block 1

But it is tedious to visualize the same for 100 blocks.. What would be the best method to view it as a single plot using R..I tried doing it with heat maps but I would rather visualize them as a graph..

In the end it should be something like ( I have a rough figure of it).. Iam not sure how to do this in R for several blocks in a single plot or some other better way to visualize it: enter image description here

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Sounds like you want sparklines, or something similar. –  Thomas Jun 24 '13 at 17:10
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is basically what ggplot2 is for, in my opinion. Here is a recreation of your data, along with a very basic plot.

# Recreate your data.
data<-c(6,6,4,5,8,9,8,6,3,3,4,5,4,2,1,5,3,3,4,2,4,8,3,1,6,5,4,3,9,8,2,6,8,3,4,5,7,6,2,2,10,9,6,8,9,4,6,7)
list<-split(data,rep(1:6,each=8))
names(list)<-paste0('Block',1:6)

library(ggplot2)
library(reshape2)
dat<-melt(list)[2:1]
names(dat)<-c('Block','Value')
dat$brain.section<-rep(1:8,6)

ggplot(dat,aes(x=brain.section,y=Value,group=Block)) + geom_line() + facet_grid(Block~.)

enter image description here

You can get really fancy with colours and layout, but you can use that as something to get you started if you don't know ggplot2.

Here is what a heat map of the same data would look like

ggplot(dat,aes(x=brain.section,fill=Value,y=Block)) + geom_tile() 

enter image description here

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But, it doesn't really make sense (to me) to plot different sections of the brain as a line, because it implies that there is something relevant about the order of the brain sections. A heat map seems more appropriate, but you mentioned that you dislike it. –  nograpes Jun 24 '13 at 17:28
    
although this looks like what the OP asked for. –  Paul Hiemstra Jun 24 '13 at 18:05
    
@nograpes: I do not dislike heatmaps..I did not know how I have to represent it correctly for the different blocks and regions ! But if it is more convenient to visualize, I would rather go for it.. –  user2258452 Jun 25 '13 at 5:13
    
@user2258452 Here is a heat map. The heat map would look much better with hundreds of blocks, I think. For example, one interesting thing you can see in the heat map is that brain section T2 is very consistent across the blocks, something that is difficult to see with the lines. –  nograpes Jun 25 '13 at 11:48
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Here an alternative using lattice xyplot. The data example are realistic a matrix (100x8). I tried to remove the strip to optimize plot region. I think the result is only useful to get a global idea or main trend of the data.

dat <- matrix(sample(1:10,100*8,rep=TRUE),nrow=8,
              dimnames=list(paste0('T',1:8),paste0('Block',1:100)))
library(reshape2)
dat.m <- melt(dat)
xyplot(value~Var1|Var2,
       data=dat.m,type=c('l','p'),
       strip =FALSE,layout = c(10,10))

enter image description here

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Here is an alternative that matches more or less the desired result. I guess that the scale is unimportant given the large number of blocks to be visualized.

## Recreate the data
my.data <- c(6,6,4,5,8,9,8,6,3,3,4,5,4,2,1,5,3,3,4,2,4,8,3,1,6,5,4,3,9,8,2,6,8,3,4,5,7,6,2,2,10,9,6,8,9,4,6,7)
n.block <- 6
n.sect  <- 8
my.list <- split(my.data, rep(1:n.block, each = n.sect))
names(my.list) <- paste0("Block", 1:n.block)
sect.name <- paste0("T", 1:n.sect)

## Plot
scale.fact <- max(my.data)
plot(my.list[[1]], type = "n", axes = FALSE, ylim = c(1, n.block + 1), xlab = "", ylab = "")
for (i in seq(along = my.list)){
    lines(i + my.list[[i]]/scale.fact)
}
axis(1, at = 1:n.sect, labels = sect.name, tick = TRUE)
axis(2, at = 1:n.block + sapply(my.list, function(x) x[[1]][1])/scale.fact,
 labels = names(my.list), tick = TRUE, las = 1)
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