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I think this problem has broken my brain. This is what I'm ultimately trying to make:

mylibrary = [{:shelfa => ["booka", "bookb", "bookc"]}, {shelfb=> ["booka", "bookb"]}]

This is what I have:

class Library

  def initialize
    #create library array
    @library = Array.new
  end

  def add_shelf(shelf_name)
    #create shelf hash ({:shelfa => []}
    @shelf_name = Shelf.new
    #add shelf hash to library array
    @library << @shelf
  end

end

  class Shelf
    attr_accessor: shelf_name

    def initialize
      #create shelf hash {:shelfa => []}
      @shelf = Hash.new{|shelf_name, book_array| shelf_name[book_array] = []}
    end
  end

Which should get me to this:

mylibrary = {:shelfa => [], shelfb: => []}

But now I need a third class, Book, which will create an individual book and put it on a given shelf, ie push the title to the value array of the corresponding shelf key. This is what I have:

class Book
    attr_accessor :title, :shelf_name

    def initialize(title, shelf_name)
      @title = title
      @shelf_name = shelf_name
    end

    def add_book(title, shelf_name)
      #push titles to empty array in the hash with key shelf_name
    end

  end

Any ideas? I don't know if this explanation makes any sense, I can try to explain better if you have a question. Thanks!

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Dont you actually need to give the shelves a name? I dont see any –  Hunter McMillen Jun 24 '13 at 16:51
    
Why is library an array? Or is it? You talk about it being both. Seems to make more sense as a hash, @library[shelf_name] = Shelf.new. The add_book method should probably also be on the shelf class. –  numbers1311407 Jun 24 '13 at 16:53
1  
You have some serious misunderstandings about the purpose of OOP. You shouldn't be building three classes to wrap a single hierarchal array. You should also rethink your names: A Library doesn't contain an array of shelves called @library, it should contain an array of shelves called @shelves. Likewise, a Shelf doesn't contain an array of books called @shelf, it should contain @books. –  meagar Jun 24 '13 at 17:00

3 Answers 3

You've got an obvious typo in your code, which will work, but yield very bad results:

First, you initialize @shelf_name:

#create shelf hash ({:shelfa => []}
@shelf_name = Shelf.new

Then, you reference @shelf, which is nil:

#add shelf hash to library array
@library << @shelf
share|improve this answer

Aside from some obvious typos/errors (some of which I corrected below), your logic for this program seems to be off. For one, it would make more sense for library to be a hash also. Secondly, you can't have a method add_book inside of the Book class; Books get added to Libraries. Book should only contain information about the Book itself: name, author, genre, etc...

class Library
  def initialize
    #create library array
    @library = []
  end

  def add_shelf( shelf_name )
    #create shelf hash ({:shelfa => []}
    @shelf = Shelf.new shelf_name

    #add shelf hash to library array
    @library << @shelf
  end

  def add_book( book, shelf_name )
     # your code here
  end
end

class Shelf
  attr_accessor :shelf_name, :shelf

  def initialize shelf_name
    @shelf_name = shelf_name 

    #create shelf hash {:shelfa => []}
    @shelf = { shelf_name => [] }
  end
end
share|improve this answer

so...

@library[shelf_name] << title

... seems like the obvious answer.

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