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I am making a program to count the no. of real no.s with .1 precision. the following is the code i tried, but compiler is displaying floating point:divide by zero. any advice,much appreciated.

#include <iostream.h>
#include <conio.h>

void main()
{
    int d, count = 0;
    for (int x = 0.1; x < 100.1; x = x + 0.1)
    {
        d = x - (81.25 / x);

        if (d =! 0)
            count++;
    }
    cout << "count = " << count;
    getch();
}
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closed as too localized by 0x499602D2, talonmies, Hanlet Escaño, Mario, Mohammad Ali Baydoun Jun 24 '13 at 22:51

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4  
if (d = !0) seems wrong. –  Tom van der Woerdt Jun 24 '13 at 17:39
    
Just as a note, you should incriment x by .125 because that can be represented exactly in a float where .1 cannot. –  Sam I am Jun 24 '13 at 17:39
13  
do you know what int means? –  David Brown Jun 24 '13 at 17:40
    
First of all, your if statement is an assignment, not a comparison(it should be a comparison). d != 0 is what you want. Your only division is 81.25 / x. Have you tried putting if ( x == 0 ) { cout << "x is 0" << endl; } before that line and seeing if it triggers in the debugger? You'll see it's 0, because x is an int(you want to declare it float x or double x –  Ryan Jun 24 '13 at 17:44
    
why are you adding decimals to integers? as for the first iteration 0.1 is assigned as 0 to integer x –  Saksham Jun 24 '13 at 17:44

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use double instead of int in your for-loop. 'int x = 0.1' rounds to zero. This zero is then converted (implicitly) into a double in your division, so you get the error.

/Edit: As some comments suggested, you should use an integer type in the for loop to prevent rounding errors:

for (int i = 1; i <= 1000; ++i)
{
    double x = (double)i * 0.1;
    double d = x - (81.25 / x);

    if (d != 0.0)
        count++;
}
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1  
I might suggest using an integer for the loop counter and then multiplying it by some floating-point constant (such as 0.1) inside the loop body. Otherwise error may gradually accumulate as you add 0.1 one thousand times. –  Matt Kline Jun 24 '13 at 17:51
    
You are right Eric. Does someone know if a compiler like msvc would rewrite your version into mine if you specify the fast floating-point model instead of the precise (msvc has this option in its optimization-tab). –  Marius Jun 24 '13 at 18:07
    
@Marius: Do you mean change x * .1 to x / 10.? I would not expect a compiler to do that. In this case, I just think people should be aware of what rounding errors are present. It will not affect this particular code (since it only needs x accurately enough to determine it is not a square root of 81.25, and none of the candidates are close), but programmers have this understanding of their code. –  Eric Postpischil Jun 24 '13 at 18:18
    
Just had a look into the MSDN, it says if you enable the fast floating-point model the compiler is allowed to use the following algebraic rule: a/b = a*(1/b) Nice to know, but irrelevant in this topic, I apologize for the off-topic. –  Marius Jun 24 '13 at 18:24
    
Re: "casted (implicitly)" - that should be converted. There is no such thing as an implicit cast. A cast is something you write in your source code to tell the compiler to do a conversion. –  Pete Becker Jun 24 '13 at 18:35
for (int x = 0.1; x < 100.1; x = x + 0.1)

This becomes (because of integer rounding) :

for (int x = 0; x < 100.1; x = x + 0)

Which the compiler might interpret as

int x = 0; while (true)

And then, since x=0, 81.25/0 produces a warning.

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Why is 81.25 / x (where x = 0) a problem? The zero would be upcast to double, right? –  harold Jun 24 '13 at 17:49
    
You'd still be doing 81.25/0.0 –  Tom van der Woerdt Jun 24 '13 at 17:50
    
That would just result in PositiveInfinity, no problem there –  harold Jun 24 '13 at 17:51
    
@harold A compiler might warn about it though. Although it shouldn't produce an actual error. –  Tom van der Woerdt Jun 24 '13 at 17:59
    
@EricPostpischil You're right. Updated my answer to (somewhat) reflect that. –  Tom van der Woerdt Jun 24 '13 at 17:59

As others have noted, you must use a floating-point type such as float or double to use non-integer values.

However, there is another problem that will affect your code. Rounding errors in floating-point arithmetic may accumulate in the object you use to control the loop, and the termination condition (x < 100.1) may suffer from rounding errors.

To iterate through non-integer values without accumulating errors from iteration to iteration or suffering from rounding errors affecting the termination condition, use an integer counter. Inside the loop, scale it as desired:

// i is scaled to ten times the desired value.
for (int i = 1; i < 1001; ++i)
{
    double x = i / 10.;
    …
}

There will still be some rounding errors, but at least they will not accumulate, and your loop will end with the desired iteration instead of one more or fewer.

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The int type holds whole integers, not real numbers. This statement (int x = 0.1; x < 100.1; x = x + 0.1) will be interpreted as (int x = 0; x < 100; x = x + 0) and therefore d = x - (81.25 / x); will result in a divide by zero.

As suggested in other answers you should change the type to double or float.

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Changing the type is insufficient to fix the code. If the compiler uses float or double arithmetic (rather than some extended precision), then the last iteration will be performed with x set to a value slightly less than 100.1 and will end with a value that is approximately 100.2, which is likely not intended. –  Eric Postpischil Jun 24 '13 at 17:50

Replace your 'int' variables with 'float' or 'double' variables. Int variables represent integers, which cannot contain decimal points. When you set int x = 0.1, it is truncated to x = 0, causing your divide by zero error.

share|improve this answer
    
Changing the type is insufficient to fix the code. If the compiler uses float or double arithmetic (rather than some extended precision), then the last iteration will be performed with x set to a value slightly less than 100.1 and will end with a value that is approximately 100.2, which is likely not intended. –  Eric Postpischil Jun 24 '13 at 17:52

Your variable x is an integer. So setting it to 0.1 will make it 0. Make it double or float. Same applies to d.

share|improve this answer
    
Changing the type is insufficient to fix the code. If the compiler uses float or double arithmetic (rather than some extended precision), then the last iteration will be performed with x set to a value slightly less than 100.1 and will end with a value that is approximately 100.2, which is likely not intended. –  Eric Postpischil Jun 24 '13 at 17:52
    
It will stop the code from dividing by zero, which is certainly progress. It may not give the "perfect" result. But feel free to write a complete answer that gives exactly the right result, and you'll get my vote. –  Mats Petersson Jun 24 '13 at 18:01

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