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I'd like to use the generate series function in redshift, but have not been successful.

The redshift documentation says it's not supported. The following code does work:

select *
from generate_series(1,10,1)

outputs:

1
2
3
...
10

I'd like to do the same with dates. I've tried a number of variations, including:

select *
from generate_series(date('2008-10-01'),date('2008-10-10 00:00:00'),1)

kicks out:

 ERROR: function generate_series(date, date, integer) does not exist
 Hint: No function matches the given name and argument types.
 You may need to add explicit type casts. [SQL State=42883]

Also tried:

select *
from generate_series('2008-10-01 00:00:00'::timestamp,
'2008-10-10 00:00:00'::timestamp,'1 day')

And tried:

select *
from generate_series(cast('2008-10-01 00:00:00' as datetime),
cast('2008-10-10 00:00:00' as datetime),'1 day')

both kick out:

ERROR: function generate_series(timestamp without time zone, timestamp without time zone, "unknown") does not exist
Hint: No function matches the given name and argument types.
You may need to add explicit type casts. [SQL State=42883]

If not looks like I'll use this code from another post:

SELECT to_char(DATE '2008-01-01'
+ (interval '1 month' * generate_series(0,57)), 'YYYY-MM-DD') AS ym

PostgreSQL generate_series() with SQL function as arguments

share|improve this question
2  
Run SELECT version() against your database to retrieve your version of Postgres. – Erwin Brandstetter Jun 24 '13 at 19:05

Amazon Redshift seems to be based on PostgreSQL 8.0.2. The timestamp arguments to generate_series() were added in 8.4.

Something like this, which sidesteps that problem, might work in Redshift.

SELECT current_date + (n || ' days')::interval
from generate_series (1, 30) n

It works in PostgreSQL 8.3, which is the earliest version I can test. It's documented in 8.0.26.

Later . . .

It seems that generate_series() is unsupported in Redshift. But given that you've verified that select * from generate_series(1,10,1) does work, the syntax above at least gives you a fighting chance. (Although the interval data type is also documented as being unsupported on Redshift.)

Still later . . .

You could also create a table of integers.

create table integers (
  n integer primary key
);

Populate it however you like. You might be able to use generate_series() locally, dump the table, and load it on Redshift. (I don't know; I don't use Redshift.)

Anyway, you can do simple date arithmetic with that table without referring directly to generate_series() or to interval data types.

select (current_date + n)
from integers
where n < 31;

That works in 8.3, at least.

share|improve this answer
3  
+1 That seems to explain it. Less than impressive from amazon ... – Erwin Brandstetter Jun 24 '13 at 19:18

Try:

SELECT *
FROM   generate_series(date('2008-10-01')
                     , date('2008-10-10 00:00:00')
                     , interval '1 day');
SELECT *
FROM   generate_series('2008-10-01 0:0'::timestamp
                     , '2008-10-10 0:0'::timestamp
                     , '1 day'::interval);  -- other syntax variant for cast

The point being that this form requires a literal that can be coerced to an interval for the 3rd parameter, as can be deduced from the manual for generate_series().

Modern versions accept a string literal and coerce to interval automatically, as long as it can be coerced. Older versions may require an explicit cast like I demonstrate.

If that still doesn't work for you, you are most certainly running an outdated version of Postgres (which you cunningly kept a secret).

share|improve this answer

The generate_series() function is not fully supported by Redshift. See the Unsupported PostgreSQL functions section of the developer guide.

share|improve this answer

Using Redshift today, you can generate a range of dates by using datetime functions and feeding in a number table.

select (getdate()::date - generate_series)::date from generate_series(1,30,1)

Generates this for me

date
2015-11-06
2015-11-05
2015-11-04
2015-11-03
2015-11-02
2015-11-01
2015-10-31
2015-10-30
2015-10-29
2015-10-28
2015-10-27
2015-10-26
2015-10-25
2015-10-24
2015-10-23
2015-10-22
2015-10-21
2015-10-20
2015-10-19
2015-10-18
2015-10-17
2015-10-16
2015-10-15
2015-10-14
2015-10-13
2015-10-12
2015-10-11
2015-10-10
2015-10-09
2015-10-08
share|improve this answer
    
while this generates a series, I have found no way (CTE, subquery, or inserting into a table or temporary table to join it to another table for filtering). – cfeduke Jan 25 at 18:06

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