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Why is the following code true?

>>> foo = {}
>>> foo > 1
True
>>> foo < 1
False
>>> foo == 0
False
>>> foo == -1
False
>>> foo == 1
False

I understand what I wanted was len(foo) > 1, but as a beginner this surprised me.

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12  
Thankfully, this has become illegal in Python 3. –  Tim Pietzcker Jun 24 '13 at 20:19
2  
Note that it's not just greater than 1, it's greater than all ints. –  David Robinson Jun 24 '13 at 20:22
3  
Just so it's a bit more clear, any sequence is always greater than any number. E.g. foo > float('inf') yields True. The same holds for lists, tuples, etc, as well as dicts. That doesn't explain the rationale, but hopefully it helps things make a bit more sense. –  Joe Kington Jun 24 '13 at 20:22
    
@JoeKington Source? I thought it was based on the type name, so the property you describe would at most be a coincidence. Plus, a dict is not a sequence (it's a mapping). –  delnan Jun 24 '13 at 20:24
5  
@doubleDown It even surprises everyone who uses Python. Which it why it was removed. –  delnan Jun 24 '13 at 20:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

From the docs:

The operators <, >, ==, >=, <=, and != compare the values of two objects. The objects need not have the same type. If both are numbers, they are converted to a common type. Otherwise, objects of different types always compare unequal, and are ordered consistently but arbitrarily. You can control comparison behavior of objects of non-builtin types by defining a __cmp__ method or rich comparison methods like __gt__, described in section 3.4.

(This unusual definition of comparison was used to simplify the definition of operations like sorting and the in and not in operators. In the future, the comparison rules for objects of different types are likely to change.)

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rich comparison between incompatible types is based on the name(?) of the type in python2.x and has been disallowed in python3.x.

In any event, in python2.x, the ordering is guaranteed to give the same results for a particular python implementation and version, but the ordering itself is not defined.

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2  
I was going to write that, too. Then I thought: "But "int" > "dict", so why isn't foo < 1?" –  Tim Pietzcker Jun 24 '13 at 20:22
    
@TimPietzcker -- Good point ... Hmmm... –  mgilson Jun 24 '13 at 20:24
6  
5.3. Comparisons states: "CPython implementation detail: Objects of different types except numbers are ordered by their type names; objects of the same types that don’t support proper comparison are ordered by their address." So it's true in general, just not for numbers. Weird. –  delnan Jun 24 '13 at 20:27

I think this may have arisen from the fact that comparison operators only need to be partially defined to be derived, i.e. if you can test for == and < then you can derive the rest of the operators, <= is (< or ==), > is not <=, etc. so in the case of foo = {} you can get:

Python 2:

>>> foo == 0
False
>>> foo < 0
False
>>> not (foo <= 0)
True
so:
>>> foo > 0
True

python 3:

>>> foo = {}
>>> foo < 0
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: unorderable types: dict() < int()
>>> foo > 0
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: unorderable types: dict() > int()
>>> foo == 0
False
>>> 
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