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I have many HTML documents that contain legal information, each of which is a nested ordered list that alternates between letters & digits. For example:

<ol type="1">
  <li>First</li>
  <li>Second
    <ol type="a">
      <li>Third</li>
      <li>Fourth
        <ol type="1">
          <li>Fifth</li>
        </ol>
      </li>
      <li>Sixth</li>
    </ol>
  </li>
  <li>Seventh</li>
</ol>

I would like to use CSS or jQuery to display the full path of each list item - so the above list would result in:

1) First
2) Second
  2.a) Third
  2.b) Fourth
    2.b.1) Fifth
  2.c) Sixth
3) Seventh

I know it is possible to use counters in CSS to do this with numbers, but is there a way to do it with letters as well?

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The numbers in counters don't refer to the text in a list, but the zero-based index of the list item. What do you mean by "full path"? –  isherwood Jun 24 '13 at 21:14
    
@isherwood I think he means labels like "2.b" versus "b" for item "Fourth", for example. –  Marc Audet Jun 24 '13 at 21:16
    
Yes he means 2.b.1) instead of just 1.. Copy+paste it to a fiddle and you'll see it. –  Stano Jun 24 '13 at 21:17
    
David Walsh did exactly that : davidwalsh.name/css-counters –  Tomer Arazy Jun 24 '13 at 21:21
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

How about a little jQuery to add the indices :

var letters = 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz';
$('li').each(function (i, ele) {
    $('<span />', {html : (function() {
        return $(ele).parents('li').addBack().map(function (_, a) {
                 return isNaN( $(a).parent('ol').attr('type') ) ? 
                        letters[$(a).index()] : $(a).index() + 1;
                }).get().join('.') + ')&nbsp;';
     }())}).prependTo(ele);
});

FIDDLE

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Thanks that is perfect! –  billyswifty Jun 25 '13 at 0:53
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Here is one way of doing it using standard CSS 2.1.

The HTML is similar to yours except I defined some classes for convenience:

<ol class="level-1" type="1">
    <li>First</li>
    <li>Second
        <ol class="level-2" type="a">
            <li>Third</li>
            <li>Fourth
                <ol class="level-3" type="1">
                    <li>Fifth</li>
                </ol>
            </li>
            <li>Sixth</li>
        </ol>
    </li>
    <li>Seventh</li>
</ol>

For the CSS, I define 3 custom counters (cnt-1, cnt-2, cnt-3) and use the content property to display the custom formatted labels:

ol.level-1 {
    counter-reset: cnt-1;
    list-style: none;
}
ol.level-1 li:before {
    content: counter(cnt-1)".";
    counter-increment: cnt-1
}
ol.level-2 {
    counter-reset: cnt-2;
    list-style: none;
}
ol.level-2 li:before {
    content: counter(cnt-1)"."counter(cnt-2,lower-alpha);
    counter-increment: cnt-2
}
ol.level-3 {
    counter-reset: cnt-3;
    list-style: none;
}
ol.level-3 li:before {
    content: counter(cnt-1)"."counter(cnt-2,lower-alpha)"."counter(cnt-3);
    counter-increment: cnt-3
}

ol li:before {
    display: inline-block;
    margin-right: 5px;
}

You can see the demo at: http://jsfiddle.net/audetwebdesign/TJYVf/

The exact styling with margin and padding will depend on your specific layout needs, but this demo illustrate the concept.

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2  
+1 I did this recently in HTML for displaying legal documents and it worked excellently. This is compatible back to IE8, and preferable to JavaScript unless you have to worry about compatibility with very old browsers. –  Jonathan Hobbs Jun 24 '13 at 22:03
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Not quite what your after, but close. Try this:

<style>
    ol { list-style-type:upper-latin; }
</style>

That will print your index item labels as letters.

If you wanted something like "1a...2a...2a.a" you'd have to use either javascript / server side code to build up your list in a loop programatically.

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