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I'm trying to modernise a 50 page website which doesn't use ajax and so is really hard to maintain since every edit has to be done on 50 pages.

Now I've rid all 50 pages of duplicate HTML but it's not working well:

function hijax() {
  $("a").click(function (e) {
    e.preventDefault();

    var url = this.href;
    if (url.indexOf("index.html") != -1) {
      $('#ajax').load("home.html", function () {
        hijax();
      });
    }
    else {
      $('#ajax').load(url, function () {
        hijax();
      });
    }
  });
}

This works OK for the main page, but the links loaded via Ajax aren't hijacked. It seems the callback is done before the HTML is loaded. Any way to fix that?

EDIT:

In response to Bergi:

$('#ajax').load("home.html", function (e) {
        hijax();
      });

Passing event in the callback causes the original code to work as expected. Joe's solution looks more elegant though, so I stick with that. Thanks guys.

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closed as not a real question by Joe, Omar, hjpotter92, Blorgbeard, Ernest Friedman-Hill Jun 25 '13 at 1:55

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
If edits have to be done to multiple pages for one change, then that's not a problem to solve with ajax anyway. –  Bergi Jun 24 '13 at 21:33
    
Did you intend for this to be recursive? –  AMorrise Jun 24 '13 at 21:33
    
@AlexMorrise Yes, otherwise the inline links will open a full screen page with no menu. –  Jonathan Jun 24 '13 at 21:34
3  
Replace $("a").click(function (e) { with $(document).on('click', 'a', function (e) { and remove function hijax() { and the last }. Then remove both references to hijax(); in the ajax callbacks. This uses .on() and means the event is triggered on all current and future a elements. –  Joe Jun 24 '13 at 21:35
    
How do you know the links are not hijacked? Try to put some logging in your functions, e.g. report the number of links which you have installed listeners every time. –  Bergi Jun 24 '13 at 21:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Replace:

$("a").click(function (e) {

with:

$(document).on('click', 'a', function (e) {

and remove function hijax() { and the last }.

Then remove both references to hijax(); in the ajax callbacks.

This uses .on() and means the event is triggered on all current and future a elements. Your original code wasn't binding a click event to the newly added links.

share|improve this answer
    
To expand on this: the first call binds an event handler to every a element when it's called, so future elements aren't bound. The latter call binds an event handler to the document that only responds to events on a elements, so new elements will still bubble up their events to the existing handler. –  cincodenada Jun 24 '13 at 21:53
    
The original script is binding event to the newly added links by re-executing the hijax function after ajax content was loaded. Didn't you notice that? –  Bergi Jun 24 '13 at 22:02
    
@Bergi - yes, I did notice that. However, the OP said this solution worked for them so it must have been they way they were binding the events. –  Joe Jun 24 '13 at 22:03
    
@Bergi The callback was executed but the main-area was blank when it hit the break-point. That's why I suspect the call-back was executed too soon... –  Jonathan Jun 24 '13 at 22:14

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