Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I wanted to make a horizontal line, I would do this:

<style>
#line{
    width:100px;
    height:1px;
    background-color:#000;
}
</style>
<body>
<div id="line"></div>

If I wanted to make a vertical line, I would do this:

#line{
    width:1px;
    height:100px;
    background-color:#000;
}
</style>
<body>
<div id="line"></div>

A curved line is trickier, but possible using border-radius and wrapping the element:

<style>
.curve{
    width:100px;
    height:500px;
    border:1px #000 solid;
    border-radius:100%;
}
#wrapper{
    overflow:hidden;
    width:40px;
    height:200px;
}
</style>
<body>
<div id="wrapper">
    <div class="curve"></div>
</div>
</body>

But I cannot even fathom how I could generate squiggly lines! Is this even remotely possible using only css (and javascript since it does seem that it will be necessary to be able to more easily generate them).

note:

As expected, given your answers there is no way to do this in sole css...javascript and jquery are 100 percent okay for your answer...NO IMAGES CAN BE USED

share|improve this question
    
a couple of .curve elements stuck together? –  Chad Jun 24 '13 at 21:35
1  
How about using CSS3 border images? –  elclanrs Jun 24 '13 at 21:36
    
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ –  bfavaretto Jun 24 '13 at 21:39
    
wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww –  ᾠῗᵲᄐᶌ Jun 24 '13 at 21:40
    
You might be able to so something like this using multiple div's set next to each other with a very high border-radius. You'd also have to hide the top/ bottom halves of the elements depending on if they were odd or even which you can do with CSS. –  Dropped.on.Caprica Jun 24 '13 at 21:43
show 2 more comments

6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

EDIT: Given the requirement of no images/data uri.

You can also cram a bunch of border-radius elements together, alternating with top/bottom or left/right edges disabled. I've generalized this into a function that appends them to an element.

Javascript, where squigglecount is the number of "squiggles". You could generalize that to an actual width if you so desired.

http://jsfiddle.net/V7QEJ/1/

function makeLine(id, squiggleCount)
{
    var curve;
    var lineEl = $(id);

    for (var i = 0; i < squiggleCount ; i++)
    {
        curve = document.createElement('div');
        curve.className = 'curve-1';
        lineEl.append(curve);

        curve = document.createElement('div');
        curve.className = 'curve-2';
        lineEl.append(curve);
    }
}

CSS:

.curve-1,
.curve-2{
    display: inline-block;

    border: solid 1px #f00;
    border-radius: 50px;

    height: 20px;
    width: 20px;
}

.curve-1{
    border-bottom: none;
    border-left: none;
    border-right: none;
}
.curve-2{
    border-top: none;
    border-left: none;
    border-right: none;
}

Old (with images):

There's already a bunch of answers, but here's an easy way to do a vertical squiggly line, similar to Lawson's answer.

Basically, you use background-image and a data-uri of a squiggly line to do it. I probably wouldn't use this for anything but it's an interesting thought exercise. There are a bunch of data uri generators that you can use online to change your own images.

http://jsfiddle.net/zadP7/

<div class="aux">Stuff</div>
<div class="line"></div>
<div class="aux">More Stuff</div>

.aux{
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: top;
}
.line{
    display: inline-block;

    height: 400px;
    width: 10px;

    background-image: url(...etc...) 
}
share|improve this answer
    
can't use images... –  Ryan Saxe Jun 24 '13 at 21:52
    
I added an alternative solution that does not use images if that would be of any additional help to you. –  bfuoco Jun 24 '13 at 22:09
    
That answer is the best yet, although can only work repetitively, it gives a lot of room! I'll accept it since a complicated, non repeating squiggle can clearly only be done with an image after seeing these answers –  Ryan Saxe Jun 25 '13 at 16:18
add comment

You're not going to be able to do it in pure CSS. Here's a short tutorial on how to do it with an image. The original author wanted to put the red misspelled squiggly under words.

http://www.novolocus.com/2006/09/11/using-css-to-underline-text-in-a-textbox/

share|improve this answer
    
I want to generate squiggly lines, so an image is not an option –  Ryan Saxe Jun 24 '13 at 21:50
1  
A guy tricked CSS into doing it here: codepen.io/mickeybrighton/pen/kefqz –  Lawson Jun 24 '13 at 22:05
    
    
Okay, but since javascript is an option, I could (as pointed by Sam) use sin() to create a clean version of that. I want to be able to make complicated squiggles on the fly –  Ryan Saxe Jun 24 '13 at 22:16
    
you can do this with CSS. background-image, radial-gradient,box-shadow, border-image, and so on. The probleme is the render and time spent. using less or sass or similar can help to shorten code to write. –  GCyrillus Jun 24 '13 at 22:16
add comment

if you are not looking for something really neat, but just for the fun of it, play with multiple box-shadow: http://codepen.io/gcyrillus/pen/mfGdp or http://codepen.io/gcyrillus/pen/xhqFu

.curve{
  margin:3em 0;
  width:100px;
  height:150px;
  border-radius:50%;
  box-shadow:
    0px 2px 1px -1px,
    400px 0px 0px 0px white,
    400px 2px 1px -1px ,
    300px 0px 0px 0px white,
    300px -2px 1px -1px,
    600px 0px 0px 0px white,
    600px 2px 1px -1px ,
    500px 0px 0px 0px white,
    500px -2px 1px -1px,
    800px 0px 0px 0px white,
    800px 2px 1px -1px ,
    700px 0px 0px 0px white,
    700px -2px 1px -1px,
    1000px 0px 0px 0px white,
    1000px 2px 1px -1px ,
    900px 0px 0px 0px white,
    900px -2px 1px -1px,
    1200px 0px 0px 0px white,
    1200px 2px 1px -1px ,
    1100px 0px 0px 0px white,
    1100px -2px 1px -1px,
    1400px 0px 0px 0px white,
    1400px 2px 1px -1px ,
    1300px 0px 0px 0px white,
    1300px -2px 1px -1px,
    1600px 0px 0px 0px white,
    1600px 2px 1px -1px ,
    1500px 0px 0px 0px white,
    1500px -2px 1px -1px;
  position:relative;
}
.curve:before,.curve:after {
  content:'';
  position:absolute;
  height:100%;
  width:100%;
  border-radius:100%;
  box-shadow:inherit;
}
.curve:before {
  left:100%;
  transform:rotate(180deg);
 }
.curve:after {
  left:200%;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Before there was HTML5 and Canvas, there was JavaScript VectorGraphics. You may want to give it a try if you want to draw Circles, Ellipses etc. etc. in pure HTML.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you are using Javascript, this can be easily achieved using a sine wave - this is how programming languages have achieved controllable squiggly lines for decades! You should be able to find plenty of examples out there, but essentially you just do loop with an incrementing x value and apply the sine function sin(). This used to be cool for doing screen-savers in the 90s and animating them, etc.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Instead of using the border, use a tiled background image.

I do not think there is a solution that get's away without using a graphics file and that also works in all browsers.

If you are brave you can try this:http://www.html5canvastutorials.com/tutorials/html5-canvas-arcs/

It allows to draw on the canvas in HTML5, but it would not work on older browsers.

if you can add a lot of html you can use this: http://jsfiddle.net/QsM4J/

HTML:

<body>
    <p>
    before
    </p>
    <div id="sqig">
        <div class="topsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="bottomsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="topsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="bottomsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="topsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="bottomsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="topsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="bottomsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="topsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="bottomsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="topsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="bottomsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="topsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="bottomsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="topsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="bottomsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="topsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="bottomsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="topsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="bottomsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="topsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="bottomsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="topsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="bottomsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="topsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="bottomsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="topsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="bottomsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="topsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="bottomsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="topsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="bottomsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="topsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="bottomsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="topsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="bottomsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="topsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="bottomsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="topsqig"><div></div></div>
        <div class="bottomsqig"><div></div></div>
    </div>
    <p>
    after
    </p>
</body>   

CSS:

#sqig{
    position:relative;
    width:400px;
    height:6px;
}
#sqig div{
    position:relative;
    width:6px;
    height:6px;
    display: inline-block;
    margin:0 0 0 -4px;
    padding:0;    
}
#sqig .topsqig div{
    border-radius: 3px;
    top:1px;
    border-top: 1px solid #000;
}
#sqig .bottomsqig div{
    border-radius: 3px;
    top:-1px;
    border-bottom: 1px solid #000;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I will look into html canvas...seems as I can give it a graph, which I would rather not have to come up with an equation, but it could be the only way...and I can't use an image –  Ryan Saxe Jun 24 '13 at 21:54
    
The jsfiddle does not show a squiggle for me... –  Ryan Saxe Jun 25 '13 at 16:16
    
Well, that is rather unfortunate, but somehow that link was for an old version... Anyways, I updated the link in the post to point to the new version: jsfiddle.net/QsM4J –  Sebastian Meine Jun 25 '13 at 21:38
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.