Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to figure out how these LayoutAwarePage actually changes the page state.

When orientation changes the following handler was called:

           this.InvalidateVisualState()

I am trying to understand how the call gets mapped to the right view state in the XAML? Ie

<!– Visual states reflect the application’s view state –> 
<VisualStateGroup x:Name="ApplicationViewStates"> 

    <VisualState x:Name="FullScreenLandscape"> 
        .
        .
        .             
    </VisualState> 

    <VisualState x:Name="Filled"> 
        .
        .
        .      
    </VisualState> 

    <!– The entire page respects the narrower 100-pixel margin convention for portrait –> 
    <VisualState x:Name="FullScreenPortrait"> 
        .
        .
        .      
     </VisualState> 

    <!– The back button and title have different styles when snapped –> 
    <VisualState x:Name="Snapped"> 
        .
        .
        .      
     </VisualState> 
</VisualStateGroup> 

Whatever it was doing apparently is able to resolve the correct visual state declared inside the VisualStateManager.

Also why is it Invalidating the Visual State as opposed to just calling VisualStateManager.GoToState(this,"Filled",false) for example? What else is the InvalidateVisualState doing?

share|improve this question

I think the reason is that the VisualStateManager directly communicates with windows "events".

The VisualState names "Filled", "Snapped" etc, are constants. Whenever a user snaps a metro app, the "Snapped" visual state is applied.

So when a windows event is raised to indicate that the user turned his tablet, or snapped an application, the call to InvalidateVisualState simply tells VisualStateManager that its current state is probably wrong, and it needs to be recalculated / refreshed. The new state is determined (i.e what is the current metro app state ?), and when this state is determined, the matching VisualState is applied.

That's why you will only need VisualStateManager.GoToState(this,"Custom",false) when calling a custom visual state, meaning one that is not built in.

I do not guarantee that this is actually how it works, but it is how I understand the VisualStateManager behavior. At least for Metro apps.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.