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I have a TreeMap in which I have stored some values. The map is sorted using the values, from highest to lowest. Now I want print out the contents of the TreeMap with their various indices.

If I have the following pairs in the map :

("Andrew", 10),
("John", 5),
("Don",9),
("Rolex", 30),
("Jack", 10),
("Dan",9)

I want to print out:

Rolex, 30 , 1
Jack, 10, 2
Andrew, 10, 2
Dan, 9, 4
Don, 9, 4
John, 5, 6.

This is what I've been trying but it doesn't seem to work well:

/**
 *
 * @author Andrew
 */

import java.util.*;

public class SortArray {

    static <K,V extends Comparable<? super V>> SortedSet<Map.Entry<K,V>>entriesSortedByValues(Map<K,V> map) {
        SortedSet<Map.Entry<K,V>> sortedEntries = new TreeSet<Map.Entry<K,V>>(
                new Comparator<Map.Entry<K,V>>() {
                    @Override public int compare(Map.Entry<K,V> e1, Map.Entry<K,V> e2) {
                         int res = e1.getValue().compareTo(e2.getValue());
                        return res!= 0 ? res : 1;
                        //return e1.getValue().compareTo(e2.getValue());
                    }
                });
        sortedEntries.addAll(map.entrySet());
        return sortedEntries;
    }



    public void test(){
        Map mm = new TreeMap();
        mm.put("Andrew", 11);
        mm.put("Mbata", 21);
        mm.put("Chinedu", 14);
        mm.put("Bol", 14);
        mm.put("Don", 51);
        mm.put("Rolex", 16);
        mm.put("Son", 41);
        SortedSet newMap =  entriesSortedByValues(mm);
        Iterator iter = newMap.iterator();
        int x = newMap.size();
        List names = new ArrayList();
        List scores = new ArrayList();
        while(iter.hasNext()){
            String details = iter.next().toString();
            StringTokenizer st = new StringTokenizer(details, "=");
            String name = st.nextToken();
            names.add(name);
            String score = st.nextToken();
            scores.add(score);
            //System.out.println(name + " Score:" +score + " Position:" + x);
            x--;
        }
        Collections.reverse(names);
        Collections.reverse(scores);
        int pos = 1;

        for(int i = 0; i<names.size();){
            try{
                int y = i+1;
                if(scores.get(i).equals(scores.get(y))){
                    System.out.print("Name: "+ names.get(i)+"\t");
                    System.out.print("Score: "+ scores.get(i)+"\t");
                    System.out.println("Position: "+ String.valueOf(pos));
                    //pos++;
                    i++;
                    continue;
                } else{
                    System.out.print("Name: "+ names.get(i)+"\t");
                    System.out.print("Score: "+ scores.get(i)+"\t");
                    System.out.println("Position: "+ String.valueOf(pos++));
                }
                i++;

            } catch(IndexOutOfBoundsException e) {}
        }
    }

    public SortArray(){
        test();
    }

    public static void main(String [] args){
        new SortArray();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
In the case where two values have the same score, does it matter which one gets printed out? Also, as written, you are always going to get an IndexOutOfBoundsException on the last name, which means that neither it nor it's score will get printed out. –  user949300 Jun 25 '13 at 0:20
    
Yea. there's an exception on the last name. and if two values have the same score, it has to print out both of them –  Andrew Jun 25 '13 at 10:44

3 Answers 3

First of all, Why are you catching that IndexOutOfBoundsException and doing nothing with it? if you run that you'll get that exception thrown (and I thing you already know it) the problem is in your algorithm inside the last "for" loop. I shouldn't give you the solution, but wth... at least you did some effort to make it run, so this is a more less working version:

import java.util.*;

public class SortArray {

    static <K,V extends Comparable<? super V>> SortedSet<Map.Entry<K,V>>entriesSortedByValues(Map<K,V> map) {
    SortedSet<Map.Entry<K,V>> sortedEntries = new TreeSet<Map.Entry<K,V>>(
            new Comparator<Map.Entry<K,V>>() {
                @Override public int compare(Map.Entry<K,V> e1, Map.Entry<K,V> e2) {
                    int res = e1.getValue().compareTo(e2.getValue());
                    return res != 0 ? res : 1;
                    //return e1.getValue().compareTo(e2.getValue());
                }
            });
    sortedEntries.addAll(map.entrySet());
    return sortedEntries;
    }

    public void test(){
    Map mm = new TreeMap();
    mm.put("Andrew", 11);
    mm.put("Mbata", 21);
    mm.put("Chinedu", 14);
    mm.put("Bol", 14);
    mm.put("Don", 51);
    mm.put("Rolex", 16);
    mm.put("Son", 41);
    SortedSet newMap =  entriesSortedByValues(mm);
    Iterator iter = newMap.iterator();
    int x = newMap.size();
    List names = new ArrayList();
    List scores = new ArrayList();
    while(iter.hasNext()){
        String details = iter.next().toString();
        StringTokenizer st = new StringTokenizer(details, "=");
        String name = st.nextToken();
        names.add(name);
        String score = st.nextToken();
        scores.add(score);
        //System.out.println(name + " Score:" +score + " Position:" + x);
        x--;
    }
    Collections.reverse(names);
    Collections.reverse(scores);
    int pos;
    int posBis = 0;
    String lastScore = "";

    for(int i = 0; i<names.size(); i++){
        System.out.print("Name: "+ names.get(i)+"\t");
        System.out.print("Score: "+ scores.get(i)+"\t");
        if(i == 0 || !lastScore.equals(scores.get(i))) {
            pos = i + 1;
            posBis = pos;
        } else {
            pos = posBis;
        }
        System.out.println("Position: "+ String.valueOf(pos));
        lastScore = (String)scores.get(i);
    }
    }

    public SortArray(){
    test();
    }

    public static void main(String [] args){
    new SortArray();
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Thankssssssss a lot Rafael. You've solved what I've been on for weeks. GRACIAS!!! –  Andrew Jun 25 '13 at 10:54

Your SortedSet is the wrong way to go about this. You can see in your Comparator that it gets a bit messy when both values have to be looked up by the same key then you've got this messy (and incorrect) return res != 0 ? res : 1 (the 1 should really be e1.getKey().compareTo(e2.getKey()) rather than always returning 1).

A better way to go about this would be to just sort the keys yourself in a List, rather than creating a separate SortedSet. This way you don't have to worry about duplicate sorting values.

You can also abstract out the Comparator stuff a little, to make it more reusable in other code later, if you need it.

import java.util.*;

public class PrintSomething {
    public static <T extends Comparable<T>> Comparator<T> reverseComparator(final Comparator<T> oldComparator) {
        return new Comparator<T>() {
            @Override
            public int compare(T o1, T o2) {
                return oldComparator.compare(o2, o1);
            }
        };
    }

    public static <K,V extends Comparable<V>> Comparator<K> keyedComparator(final Map<K,V> lookup) {
        return new Comparator<K>() {
            @Override
            public int compare(K o1, K o2) {
                return lookup.get(o1).compareTo(lookup.get(o2));
            }
        };
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Map<String, Integer> mm = new HashMap<>();
        mm.put("Andrew", 10);
        mm.put("John", 5);
        mm.put("Don", 9);
        mm.put("Rolex", 30);
        mm.put("Jack", 10);
        mm.put("Dan", 9);

        Comparator<String> comparator = reverseComparator(keyedComparator(mm));
        List<String> keys = Arrays.asList(mm.keySet().toArray(new String[mm.size()]));
        //Collections.sort(keys); // optional, if you want the names to be alphabetical
        Collections.sort(keys, comparator);

        int rank = 1, count = 0;
        Integer lastVal = null;
        for (String key : keys) {
            if (mm.get(key).equals(lastVal)) {
                count++;
            } else {
                rank += count;
                count = 1;
            }
            lastVal = mm.get(key);
            System.out.println(key + ", " + mm.get(key) + ", " + rank);
        }
    }
}

In general things like SortedSet make more sense when you need to keep the data itself sorted. When you just need to process something in a sorted manner one time they're usually more trouble than they're worth. (Also: is there any reason why you're using a TreeMap? TreeMaps sort their keys, but not by value, so in this case you're not taking advantage of that sorting. Using a HashMap is more common in that case.)

share|improve this answer
    
THANKS A LOT YOU ALL FOR ALL YOUR ASSISTANCE AND HELP. MY QUESTION HAS BEEN ANSWERED. FIRST TIME I'M USING STACKOVERFLOW AND I'M HIGHLY IMPRESSED. YOU GUYS ROCK!!!! –  Andrew Jun 25 '13 at 10:55
    
@Andrew Not a problem! The usual way of marking an answer as "correct" is by "accepting" it. If you click the little tick to the left of one of the answers it will mark that you consider that answer to be "correct" and give the person who wrote it some "reputation". –  mange Jun 25 '13 at 23:02

You do a lot of work with the iterator, calling toString(), then splitting the results. And your Comparator is extra work too. Stay with a Map on both sides - you can use keys() and values() more directly, and let Java do the sorting for you. Most of your above code can be replaced with: (for clarity, I changed your name "mm" to "originalMap")

Map<Integer, String> inverseMap = new TreeMap<Integer, String>();
for (Map.Entry<String, Integer> entry : originalMap.entrySet()) {
  inverseMap.put(entry.getValue(), entry.getKey());
}

Now, iterate over inverseMap to print the results. Note that if a count does exist twice in originalMap, only one will be printed, which is what you want. But which one gets printed left as an exercise for the reader :-). You might want to be more specific on that.

EDIT ADDED: If you do want to print out duplicate scores, this is not what you want. The original post I read said to skip if they were the same, but I don't see that after the edits, so I'm not sure if this is what OP wants.

share|improve this answer
    
If a value exists twice in the map doesn't he want them both to be printed, but with the same "rank"? I get the feeling this a map from students to marks (or something equivalent) and we're attempting to rank them, with equal scores sharing a rank. –  mange Jun 25 '13 at 0:41
    
@mange His original post (or, at least, the first one I read) said something about skipping scores if they were the same. And his code checks for equals and skips. However, his "I want to print out" does show duplicates. If that is true, then my answer is not what he wants. –  user949300 Jun 25 '13 at 0:57
    
for clarity, I want want to print out the scores even if they are the same. if u run my code u'll understand better. and @mange it's actually for printing the positions of students in a class based on their totals. –  Andrew Jun 25 '13 at 10:48

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