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I have an array of objects that is currently like this, in which entries are ordered by date and time:

var checkin_data = [
    {id: 430, date: "2013-05-05", time: "08:24"},
    {id: 435, date: "2013-05-06", time: "04:22"},
    {id: 436, date: "2013-05-06", time: "05:36"},
    {id: 437, date: "2013-05-06", time: "07:51"},
    {id: 488, date: "2013-05-06", time: "08:08"},
    {id: 489, date: "2013-05-06", time: "10:12"},
    {id: 492, date: "2013-05-06", time: "13:18"},
    {id: 493, date: "2013-05-06", time: "15:55"},
    {id: 494, date: "2013-05-06", time: "18:55"},
    {id: 498, date: "2013-05-06", time: "22:15"},
    {id: 501, date: "2013-05-07", time: "11:40"},
    {id: 508, date: "2013-05-07", time: "18:00"},
    {id: 520, date: "2013-05-08", time: "04:48"},
    {id: 532, date: "2013-05-09", time: "21:11"},
    {id: 492, date: "2013-05-10", time: "11:45"},
    {id: 601, date: "2013-05-11", time: "18:12"}
];

The dates represent a date in a particular week: I'd like to sort this array in order to lay it out in "rows", so the data needs to be re-sorted to lay out like this (note the order of the dates):

var checkin_data = [
{id: 430, date: "2013-05-05", time: "08:24"},
{id: 435, date: "2013-05-06", time: "04:22"},
{id: 501, date: "2013-05-07", time: "11:40"},
{id: 520, date: "2013-05-08", time: "04:48"},
{id: 532, date: "2013-05-09", time: "21:11"},
{id: 492, date: "2013-05-10", time: "11:45"},
{id: 601, date: "2013-05-11", time: "18:12"},
{id: 436, date: "2013-05-06", time: "05:36"},
{id: 508, date: "2013-05-07", time: "18:00"},
{id: 437, date: "2013-05-06", time: "07:51"},
{id: 488, date: "2013-05-06", time: "08:08"},
{id: 489, date: "2013-05-06", time: "10:12"},
{id: 492, date: "2013-05-06", time: "13:18"},
{id: 493, date: "2013-05-06", time: "15:55"},
{id: 494, date: "2013-05-06", time: "18:55"},
{id: 498, date: "2013-05-06", time: "22:15"}
];

Getting the data in that order would allow me to lay out a table like this:

data laid out as table

Thanks, any help would be appreciated.

share|improve this question
2  
Can you post some code showing what you've tried to do so far? Right now this isn't really a question but more of a "solve this problem for me" –  Mataniko Jun 25 '13 at 0:06
    
Loop through the days of the week. Find the first element in the array with that date, push it onto the result array, and remove it from the input array. Repeat this whole loop until the input array is empty. –  Barmar Jun 25 '13 at 0:18
2  
Instead of putting this in a table, just put the times into one div per day. Then it's simple. –  zyklus Jun 25 '13 at 2:00
    
So, were you eventually able to solve the issue? Did any answer solve your issue? If so please consider accepting an answer. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Oct 21 '13 at 14:29

5 Answers 5

Here is a suggestion using functional methods:

  • Reduce the list into arrays of buckets based on day, and sort that list (this is like reading the table you've got on rows)
  • Iterate through the rows in order, clear out unused ones.

Here:

//first, we collapse the array into an array of buckets by day
half_sorted = checkin_data.reduce(function(accum,cur){ 
    var bucket = new Date(cur.date).getDay();
    accum[bucket].push(cur);
    return accum;
},[[],[],[],[],[],[],[]]).map(function(day){
    return day.sort(function(x,y){ // now we sort each bucket
        return new Date("01-01-1990 "+x.time) - new Date("01-01-1990 "+y.time);
    });    
});
// At this point, we have an array with 7 cells looking like your table
// if we look at its columns.

// finally, we push to the result table.
var result = [];
var daysToClear = 7;
for(var i=0;daysToClear>0;i=(i+1)%7){
    if(half_sorted[i] && half_sorted[i].length > 0){
        result.push(half_sorted[i].pop());
    }else if(half_sorted[i] && half_sorted[i].length === 0){
        half_sorted[i] = null;
        daysToClear--;
    }
}

Working fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
I think that's actually the same sort I already have - the data starts out sorted by time. –  stylecramper Jun 25 '13 at 0:38
    
Oh, so you want to sort based on day of week and then time? That's just as easy didn't realize that, update coming right up –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Jun 25 '13 at 0:40
    
Actually no - have another look at the question (also, I've coded a solution below). –  stylecramper Jun 25 '13 at 0:43
    
@BenjaminGruenbaum I think you still haven't understood the requirements. The sort order is NOT ordered by any single column--please reread the original post as stylecramper suggested. –  ErikE Jun 25 '13 at 0:56
    
@ErikE I know I haven't understood the requirements, I've asked OP for clarification (see the comment directly above you) –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Jun 25 '13 at 1:01

First of all, I think you're going about this in the wrong way. Please see my note below the following code.

To do exactly as you've asked, here's one way:

// parsing the date strings ourselves avoids time zone problems
function dateFromString(string) {
   var parts = string.split('-');
   return new Date(parseInt(parts[0], 10),
                   parseInt(parts[1], 10) - 1,
                   parseInt(parts[2], 10));
}

The above is a utility function.

var i, l, dates = [[], [], [], [], [], [], []], item;
// place the objects into dow-sorted buckets
for (i = 0, l = checkin_data.length; i < l; i += 1) {
   item = checkin_data[i];
   dates[dateFromString(item.date).getDay()].push(item);
}

i = 0;
l = 0;
checkin_data = [];

while (true) { // instead of a for loop to handle the row-wrap manually
   if (dates[i][l]) {
      item = dates[i][l];
      checkin_data.push(item);
   }
   i += 1;
   if (i === 7) {
      if (!item) {
         break; // we had a complete row with no data
      }
      item = undefined;
      l += 1;
      i = 0;
   }
}

checkin_data is now sorted in the order you requested.

Note: you really don't need the second loop, because it is doing most of the work you'll have to do again to use the provided array. So in your routine for writing out the table, instead just use the data structure that the first loop creates. You would of course need a slightly different bailout strategy since you don't want to create an extra blank row, but I'll leave that up to you.

After a bit of thought, though, I came up with another way to do it, if you don't mind adding a new key to your objects:

function dateFromString(string) {
   var parts = string.split('-');
   return new Date(parseInt(parts[0], 10),
                   parseInt(parts[1], 10) - 1,
                   parseInt(parts[2], 10));
}

var i, l, counts = [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0], item, dow;

for (i = 0, l = checkin_data.length; i < l; i += 1) {
   item = checkin_data[i];
   dow = dateFromString(item.date).getDay();
   item.sortKey = ++counts[dow] * 7 + dow;
}

checkin_data.sort(function(a, b) {
   return a.sortKey - b.sortKey;
});
share|improve this answer
    
Downvoters, what's the problem? You don't like while (true)? How about some charity extended to the downtrodden, or are your hearts as cold as ice? :) :) :) –  ErikE Jun 25 '13 at 1:43
    
I got downvoted too here, don't know why either.. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Jun 25 '13 at 1:46
    
+1 as there's nothing wrong with this answer. The day shift probably is because they parse the date in UTC, but get your local day. –  Bergi Jun 25 '13 at 1:52
    
Thank you, @Bergi! so my code has a problem because it will stop working once I wrap past midnight. Any suggestions on how to fix that, since it is important for my solution to know which day of the week is Sunday? –  ErikE Jun 25 '13 at 1:54
    
No, midnight is not important. The script will work for all people who have the same timezone offset direction as you. For the others (and those with a different browser) it will just rotate the weekdays. How to fix that? Either parse the dates manually and feed them into the local new Date(year, month, date) constructor, or extend their format so that it enforces UTC parsing and then use .getUTCDay(). For the latter it's hard to find a cross-browser format, though - especially for old IEs –  Bergi Jun 25 '13 at 2:04

I've come up with a solution, maybe not the most elegant, but it's working:

var sorted_data = [], elements_to_dump = [], i, j, tmp;

while (checkin_data.length > 0) {

    for (i = 0; i < checkin_data.length; i++) {
        if (checkin_data[i-1]) {
            if (checkin_data[i-1].date === checkin_data[i].date) {
                continue;
            } 
        }
        sorted_data.push(checkin_data[i]);
        elements_to_dump.push(checkin_data[i].id);
    }
    for (j = 0; j < elements_to_dump.length; j++) {
        for (i = 0; i < checkin_data.length; i++) {
            if (checkin_data[i].id === elements_to_dump[j]) {
                tmp = checkin_data.splice(i, 1);
                break;
            }
        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
what's the tmp for? –  Lyn Headley Jun 25 '13 at 0:57
    
For what it's worth, that's a lot of loops to perform the job. You have a nested loop, and a nested, nested loop... –  ErikE Jun 25 '13 at 2:01

I'd like to sort this array in order to lay it out in "rows", so the data needs to be re-sorted [into this linear representation]. Getting the data in that order would allow me to lay out a table

No, it does not need to be. Actually, that's one step too much, and the order of your intermediate result makes absolutely no sense. What you should do instead is construct a (weekday-) list of (entries-per-day-) lists:

var days = [];
for (var i=0, date=null, day; i<checkin_data.length; i++) {
    var entry = checkin_data[i];
    if (entry.date !== date)
        days.push(day = []);
    day.push(entry);
}

That's it, you have you two-dimensional format now. Well, maybe you will need to transpose it to get it into the table you wanted, but that's not too complicated either:

var header = [],
    table = [header]; // or create a DOM or a HTML string or whatever
for (var i=0; i<days.length; i++)
    header.push(days[i][0].date /* or the weekday name? */);
for (var r=0; !done; r++) {
    var row = [],
        done = true;
    // create cells:
    for (var i=0; i<days.length; i++)
        if (days[i].length > r) {
            row[i] = days[i][r].time;
            done = false;
        } else
            row[i] = "";
    }
    if (!done)
        table.push(row);
}
share|improve this answer
    
You know... your code assumes there will only be 7 days of dates. I guess that may work because the OP's example had no labels that would show which week a date was in. I lost some simple optimization I could have done since I didn't realize this aspect. :) –  ErikE Jun 25 '13 at 6:00
    
No, my code just assumes that there are several different dates; and each of them will get one spot in the days array (days without entries are not representable). I didn't knew whether the OP wanted only weekdays, then prepopulating days with 7 arrays and pushing to them with % 7 would indeed make more sense. –  Bergi Jun 25 '13 at 11:50
2  
This just points to how better questions lead to better answers, and avoid a potentially enormous amount of thrashing on the part of the would-be-answerers! Without clear requirements we all did things a bit differently, making it hard to compare answers. –  ErikE Jun 25 '13 at 17:29

What you're trying to do is very simple. This is what I would do:

var groups = groupBy(checkin_data, "date");      // groups items based on date
var table = zipAll.apply(null, toArray(groups)); // zips corresponding elements
                                                 // of each group into an array

After this you may create your table as follows:

var header = getHeader(groups), rows = map(table, getRow);
document.body.appendChild(getTable(header, rows));

Of course the actual code would be much bigger (a little more than 100 lines of code) since you need to write the logic for groupBy, toArray, zipAll, map, getHeader, getRow, getTable, etc.

Luckily for you I had the time to go and write all this stuff. Hence you now have a working demo: http://jsfiddle.net/hZFJw/

I would suggest that you browse through my code and try to understand how it works. It's too much to explain in one answer.

Note: My solution may be more than 100 lines of code. However it's still a simple solution because:

  1. The actual code which generates the table is just 4 lines long and is very simple to understand.
  2. The rest of the code is composed of reusable functions like groupBy, zipAll and map. These functions are very small and simple to understand.
  3. Overall by abstracting the program into reusable functions the size of the program has increased. However the complexity of the program has considerably decreased.

You could achieve the same result by tackling the problem in an imperative style like most other answers do. However doing so makes the program harder to understand. Compare my code with other answers and see for yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
Over 100 lines of code is very simple? –  ErikE Jun 25 '13 at 5:53
1  
@ErikE Yes, it is. You may have a ten thousand line program which is still simple to understand. Simplicity has nothing to do with length. For example look at the OP's own answer. It's just 23 lines of code, but it's definitely not simple to understand. You need to do a lot of contemplating to understand what's going on. On the other hand my solution is 112 lines of code. However most of it is just reusable functions. The actual code which creates the table is just 4 lines of code and that's easy to understand. You don't need to know anything else. –  Aadit M Shah Jun 25 '13 at 6:00
2  
FYI, in your solution, if there is a date that has no times, that day of the week doesn't show in the table. On another note, the claims about easier comprehension, in my opinion, don't quite hold. In a code library where the functions get used over and over--then I would agree with you. But for this simple, focused purpose (will the OP really adopt your functions for his whole code base?) I am just not convinced we need to abstract it all out. I admire the thrust behind it all, and I also think you're overstating the case. P.S. the "luckily for you" line--are you kidding there? –  ErikE Jun 25 '13 at 6:17
1  
getTable, getHeader and getRow are not reusable and they are definitely not understandable without fully reading their source code instead of just looking at the name. –  Esailija Jun 25 '13 at 6:34
1  
You are saying it's 4 lines of code to understand, which is wrong, I need to understand all those getX functions because their names are completely useless and have code specific to the problem. Then there is groupBy and zipAll which are not commonly known to everyone. So in best case you have 50 lines of code and in worst case more like 90. But definitely not 4. –  Esailija Jun 25 '13 at 6:48

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