Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a templated class having two template paramters

template <typename T, class U> class A  /* ... */

and another template class that accepts a template class with two arguments as template parameter.

template <typename T, class U, template<typename X, class Y> class Z>
class B
{
    typedef typename Z<T,U>::pointer pointer;
};

Is it impossible to create an instance of B in A where Z is A?

template <typename T, class U>
class A  
{
public:
  B<T,U,A> foo (void) // compiler complaining here
  {
    B<T,U,A> test; // and here
    return test;
  }
};

A free function doing the same thing isn't problematic at all.

template<typename T, class U>
B<T, U, A> bar (void)
{
    B<T,U,A> test;
    return test;
}

In other words: Is there any rule I didn't fell over yet that prevents me from using the name of the class I am in as a template argument?


The code is:

template <typename T, class U, template<typename X, class Y> class Z>
class B
{
  typedef typename Z<T,U>::pointer pointer;
};

template <typename T, class U>
class A 
{
public:
  B<T,U, A> foo (void) 
  {
    B<T,U,A> test;
    return test;
  }
};

template<typename T, class U>
B<T, U, A> bar (void)
{
    B<T,U,A> test;
    return test;
}

int main (void)
{
 return 0;
}

And the MSVC 2012 compiler gives a Compiler Error 3200.

'A<T,U>' : invalid template argument for template parameter 'Z', expected a class template
share|improve this question
1  
No, this should work. Possible problems may be that you defined A before B, or that the compiler is confused over whether you use A as template or as current instantiation (i.e. class name) -- although GCC has no problem there, I just tried. Could you give us more details about the compiler error you get? Here is what I tried: coliru.stacked-crooked.com/… –  jogojapan Jun 25 '13 at 1:41
1  
Thanks for the edit. Then indeed your compiler is confused; it thinks you use A as class rather than template (which is generally possible). I don't have MSVC, but I figure it might help to use ::A instead of A. Have you tried? I.e. B<T,U,::A> test; for the member declaration. –  jogojapan Jun 25 '13 at 1:49
1  
An other thing that should be correct and help is to say B<T,U,A::template A> test;. –  jogojapan Jun 25 '13 at 1:51
    
On casual inspection, looks the same as stackoverflow.com/questions/5315134/… –  Tony D Jun 25 '13 at 1:52
1  
The question suggested by Tony D is indeed similar. I am not voting to close as duplicate, because in that other question, the problem seems to be related to the use of the injected class name in a constructor that refers to the inherited constructor. There are a few special rules in the Standard for the use of injected names in derived classes, and I think it makes sense to keep these two questions separate. Others may disagree. –  jogojapan Jun 25 '13 at 2:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your compiler, MSVC, seems to follow the general rule laid down in §14.6.2.1/1 C++11:

A name refers to the current instantiation if it is, [...] in the definition of a class template, [...] the injected-class name [...] of the class template [...]

Inside the definition of class template A, the name A can be used because it is "injected" into the local (class) scope of A. Therefore, and famously, you can use A as well as A::A, as well as A::A::A and so on, to refer to A. By the rule quoted above, all of these expressions refer to the current instantiation (i.e. a specific type like A<int,float>), and not to the name of template A itself.

However, there is another rule, in §14.6.1/1:

Like normal (non-template) classes, class templates have an injected-class-name (Clause 9). The injected-class-name can be used as a template-name or a type-name. When it is used [...] as a template-argument for a template template-parameter [...] it refers to the class template itself. Otherwise, it is equivalent to the template-name followed by the template-parameters of the class template enclosed in <>.

(Note that in C++03, there is no such exception for template template parameters; 14.6.1/1, in fact, is worded entirely differently. Under C++03, MSVC's interpretation of the rules was probably correct.)

Given the C++11 rule, however, in the member declaration

B<T,U,A> test;

inside the definition of A, the name A is clearly used as an argument for a template template parameter and therefore must be interpreted as template name, not as type name referring to the current instantiation.

However, it is not uncommon that compilers are confused in situations like this. There are two valid ways to tell them how to interpret A:

  1. Using the so-called normal name ::A rather than the injected one:

    B<T,U,::A> test;
    

    This is possible because of §14.6.1/5 (which was 14.6.1/2c in C++03):

    When the normal name of the template (i.e., the name from the enclosing scope, not the injected-class-name) is used, it always refers to the class template itself and not a specialization of the template. [...]

  2. Using the injected one explicitly, but designating it as a template:

    B<T,U,A::template A> test;
    

Both methods have been confirmed as solving this problem in MSVC.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanky you again. Nice to see that it's not only me who can get confused by template shuffling ;) –  Pixelchemist Jun 25 '13 at 2:34

If class A is defined before class B, I'm getting the error: 'B' does not name a type (in other words, B is not defined yet). Is this the error you are getting? It can be fixed either by placing B in front of A, or, if the two are referencing each other, by forward-declaring class B before A like this:

template <typename T, class U, template<typename X, class Y> class Z> class B;
share|improve this answer
    
The compiler actually complains about the use of A not the missing definition of B. Sorry if that wasn't clear. Thank you anyway! –  Pixelchemist Jun 25 '13 at 1:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.