Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am a little lost in how to use the CommandParameter in XAML. I am trying to bind a TextBox and a Button.

This my XAML code:

<TextBox x:Name="txtCity" Height="70"
         VerticalAlignment="Top"/>
<Button x:Name="btnCity"
        Content="Get"
        Background="CornflowerBlue"
        Height="70"
        Command="{Binding GetweatherCommand}"
        CommandParameter="{Binding ElementName=txtCity, Path=Text}"/>

In my ViewModel class I have the following to handle the clic action:

ActionCommand getWeaterCommand;          //ActionCommand derivides from ICommand
public ActionCommand GetWeatherCommand
{
        get
        {
            if (getClimaCommand != null)
            {
                getClimaCommand = new ActionCommand(() =>
                    {
                        serviceModel.getClima("????");
                    });
            }

            return getWeatherCommand;
        }
 }

My ActionCommand class:

public class ActionCommand : ICommand
{
    Action action;
    public ActionCommand(Action action)
    {
        this.action = action;
    }

    public bool CanExecute(object parameter)
    {
        return true;
    }

    public event EventHandler CanExecuteChanged;

    public void Execute(object parameter)
    {
        action();
    }
}

When I debug, the parameters in the Execute and CanExecute methods have the proper value, however I guess the problem is in the method from the ViewClass (GetWeatherCommand). I can't figure out how to pass the parameter.

So, based on the above does anyone know how can I pass the parameter to the method that will be executed?

Regards!

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

ActionCommand.Execute is ignoring the command parameter. Try this:

public class ActionCommand<TParam> : ICommand
{
    Action<TParam> action;
    public ActionCommand(Action<TParam> action)
    {
        this.action = action;
    }

    public bool CanExecute(object parameter)
    {
        return true;
    }

    public event EventHandler CanExecuteChanged;

    public void Execute(object parameter)
    {
        action((TParam)parameter);
    }
}

And then:

getClimaCommand = new ActionCommand<string>(param =>
    {
        serviceModel.getClima(param);
    });
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Richard. Thanks for your help. I have done some change to my code based in your suggestios. The ActionCommand class has been modified. However, I have a doubt about the last lines of codes. The param at the moment to instantiate the new ActionCommand, is it a variables that you decclared? –  MikePR Jun 25 '13 at 4:24
    
I did the following: ActionCommand<string> getClimaCommand; public ActionCommand<string> GetClimaCommand { get { if (getClimaCommand != null) { getClimaCommand = new ActionCommand(param => { serviceModel.getClima(param); }); } return getClimaCommand; } } –  MikePR Jun 25 '13 at 4:26
    
@MikePR - I left out the generic parameter. I've updated it as <string> And yes, I assume you'd integrate it back into your property get –  Richard Szalay Jun 25 '13 at 4:56
    
Excelent. It works like a charm ;-) –  MikePR Jun 25 '13 at 5:06
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.