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A bit of a conceptual question:

I'm creating my custom structure, in the vein of a Vector3 (3 int values) and I was working through overloading the standard operators (+,-,*, /, == etc...)

As I'm building a library for external use, I'm attempting to conform to FxCop rules. As such, they recommend having methods that perform the same function.

Eg. .Add(), .Subtract(), etc...

To save on code duplication, one of these methods (the operator overload, or the actual method) is going to call the other one.

My question is, which should call which?

Is it (and this is only an example code):

A)

    public static MyStruct operator +(MyStruct struc1, MyStruct struct2)
    {
        return struc1.Add(struct2);
    }

    public MyStruct Add(MyStruct other)
    {
        return new MyStruct (
            this.X + other.X,
            this.Y + other.Y,
            this.Z + other.Z);
    }

or:

B)

    public static MyStruct operator +(MyStruct struc1, MyStruct struct2)
    {
        return new MyStruct (
            struct1.X + struct2.X,
            struct1.Y + struct2.Y,
            struct1.Z + struct2.Z);
    }

    public MyStruct Add(MyStruct other)
    {
        return this + other;
    }

I'm really not sure either is preferable, but I'm looking for some opinions :)

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1  
Why did you make the methods instance based instead of static with two parameters? Is that what FxCop reccommended ? –  Charles Bretana Nov 13 '09 at 13:28

6 Answers 6

up vote 24 down vote accepted

I would go with A). Since operator overloading is not CLS compliant (not all .NET languages support overloading operators) it can be considered as syntactical sugar around the actual Add method.

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Ah, i didn't realise that operator overloading isn't CLI compliant. A) is it then. Thanks! –  Alastair Pitts Nov 13 '09 at 13:44
1  
The fact it ain't CLI compliant doesn't mean the compiled dll wouldn't work with other languages. –  Dykam Nov 14 '09 at 11:32
    
@Dykam: Of course not, but your customers would have to write something like MyStruct.op_Addition(myStruct1,myStruct2) if he uses a CLI language that doesn't support operator overloading for +. –  bitbonk Nov 18 '09 at 21:07

Either. It really doesn't matter. I'd expect the code to be inlined anyway, so go with whatever you consider more readable.

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1  
but that exactly what he's asking.. what do we think is more readable –  Letterman Nov 13 '09 at 12:57

Definitely A.

Methods are the real thing. Method can get extra params, they can be marked as virtual ( => can be override), overloaded, and are generally more the nature of the language. Before looking for practical reason, i think you need to feel it. beside, the CIL language protocol is not binding to support operator overloading, and that sort of clear victory to the method.

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Since it is a struct, inheritance isn't an issue (otherwise "A" makes virtual easier) - so I would go with "B", simply because I expect to call + more than I call Add... less indirection.

For a class with a genuine need for + and inheritance (unlikely), I would go "A".

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I would vote for option B since that's the more intuitive place to look at when looking at what values/properties are actually being used in the operator.

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I would also go with A for many of the reasons stated above, in particular because I view the operator overloading as a syntax mechanism that is wrapping the actual method.

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