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Yesterday while working on a project I came up on a peculiar 1:1 relationship which left me wondering - how to best implement this (clearly, we had done it wrong :D)

The idea is that there are two types of entities, A and B. They can each exist on their own just fine, but they can also have a link between them. If there is a link, then it must be a 1:1 link, and work both ways.

It's like a bottle and a cap. They can exist apart, but when coupled together the bottle will have just one cap, and the cap will be attached to just one (and the same) bottle.

How would you implement this relationship while keeping in mind all the best practices about normalization, data integrity, etc?

Added: Almost forgot to say - they each have more than a dozen properties, so putting them in the same table with half of the fields being NULL is a pretty awkward solution. Also, the link can be broken and recreated with another entity at any time.

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What you have described is a many-to-many relationship. There are many Coke bottles and many Coke caps. Any Coke cap will fit any Coke bottle but one specific Coke cap is associated with one specific Coke bottle. A true one-to_one relationship means we have two separate entities which can only exist together. If we have an instance of Entity A we must have one and only one matching instance of Entity B; furthermore the instance of Entity B must have one and only one matching instance of Entity A. This usually occurs because Entity B is a subtype of Entity A (as is Entity C, D, etc). –  APC Nov 13 '09 at 14:39

9 Answers 9

To solve this, I would start with the standard many-to-many relationship layout.

TableA
  AId
  AInfo

TableB
  BId
  BInfo

TableA2B
  AId
  BId

I would then use triggers, unique indexes, constraints to enforce the 1:1 relationship in the table. The exact method would depend on the system needs.

The reason I like this format is that many relationships have attributes as part of the relationship which are not part of the entities. This pattern allows for that now and in the future.

For example: a person works for a company. The relationship has a hire date which does not fit with the person entity or the company entity.

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So far the best one! –  Vilx- Nov 13 '09 at 13:19
CREATE TABLE A (id INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY, field1, …)

CREATE TABLE B (id INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY, field1, …)

CREATE TABLE AB (aid INT NOT NULL, bid INT NOT NULL,
                CONSTRAINT pk_ab PRIMARY KEY (aid, bid),
                CONSTRAINT ux_a UNIQUE (aid), 
                CONSTRAINT ux_b UNIQUE (bid),
                CONSTRAINT fk_aid_a FOREIGN KEY (aid) REFERENCES A,
                CONSTRAINT fk_bid_b FOREIGN KEY (bid) REFERENCES B
                )
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I think the schema would look like this:

create table A (
    A_id    integer    primary key,
    ...
);

create table B (
    B_id    integer    primary key,
    A_id    integer    references A (A_id),
    ...
);

alter table B add constraint c1 unique(A_id);

B can only reference one row in A, and since the field is unique, A can only be referenced by one row in B.

B.A_id is nullable, so rows can exist in A and B that don't reference each other.

The unique constraint doesn't preclude multiple NULL records existing. A unique constraint ensures that the values are all either unique, or NULL.

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But since it is unique, you can't have two rows with NULLs in them! –  Vilx- Nov 13 '09 at 13:16
    
@spoonmeiser : my answer was not holding that added requirement, I guess I read over it, I deleted it since it was not usefull for this question, tx for your remakr –  Peter Nov 13 '09 at 13:17
    
@Vilx: yes you can. A unique constraint implies that all values are unique, but you can have multiple NULLs because you can't compare NULL to NULL. –  SpoonMeiser Nov 14 '09 at 14:56

Nullable foreign key with a unique constraint at one or both ends depending (at boths ends is interesting!)

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Yeah, that's what we have now. A foreign key at both ends. It's also awkward when you try to establish/break a link. Has to resort to triggers 'n stuff. I was hoping for a more elegant weapon... –  Vilx- Nov 13 '09 at 13:05
    
Why awkward? Two updates in a single transaction should allow you to break and / or reconfigure a link. –  Larry Lustig Nov 13 '09 at 13:39
    
Exactly. Two updates. Awkward. :) –  Vilx- Nov 13 '09 at 14:00
    
And error-prone, because you can forget to do one somwhere. –  Vilx- Nov 13 '09 at 14:01
    
Exactly - one end is probably more elegant but then you're making an assertion that one end is notionally a parent of the other which may not, in fact, be the case. –  Murph Nov 13 '09 at 15:13

Separate join table of foreign key referencing A against foreign key referencing B, both columns with UNIQUE constraint. So either a link between two entities exists and is the only link for either of them, or no link exists so there's no row in the table.

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Umm... too slow? –  Vilx- Nov 13 '09 at 13:31
    
Umm. . .@Vilx? This is the same solution as the one by Darryl you just praised! –  Larry Lustig Nov 13 '09 at 13:37
    
That's what I mean. You were too slow at posting this and someone else already submitted the exactly same solution...20 minutes earlier. –  Vilx- Nov 13 '09 at 13:38
    
Yes, looks like Darryl's is the same idea; I didn't spot it at the time. You wouldn't need any complicated triggers to enforce it though, the UNIQUE foreign keys do that by themselves. –  bobince Nov 13 '09 at 16:38
    
@Vilx: Oops, I get you. I thought you were suggesting that @bobince's solutino was too slow. –  Larry Lustig Nov 14 '09 at 15:09

I would use the solution proposed by Darryl:

TableA
  AId
  AInfo

TableB
  BId
  BInfo

TableA2B
  AId
  BId

and then just add unique constrain on AId in tableA2B and BId on tableA2B

alter TableA2B add constraint ucAId unique(AId)
alter TableA2B add constraint ucBId unique(BId)

I think that would solve your problem

The tableA entries that are not linked to any tableB entries would simply not be present in the TableA2B similarly tableB entries not linked to tableA.

The constrains would enforce maximum one link from tableA to tableB or tableB to tableA

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There are IMO two different cases to consider. Case one is best pictured with a monogamous marriage: the two objects are created independendly, and at some point in time, they are joined; later, they might be detached, and possible joined with other objects. For such a relationship, I'd propose the A2B table approach used by many others here.

Case two is pictured with twins: if the two objects are connected, they are so since birth and they are so till one of them dies. For that case, you could choose to simply give both of them the same primary key during creation (e.g. in Oracle by selecting one value from a sequence and using it as ID for both tables).

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"A foreign key at both ends. It's also awkward when you try to establish/break a link. Has to resort to triggers 'n stuff. I was hoping for a more elegant weapon."

You will not find such an elegant weapon in the universe of SQL-based systems.

Darryl Peterson's response shows the solution that is logically correct. But some cases of "changing a link" can become a nightmare in SQL due to its lack of support for the TTM concept of "multiple assignment".

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There is a great blog post by Tony Rogerson on this: How to Create a One-to-One Relationship in SQL Server using DRI, Triggers and Views

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