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Expect is sending $expect_out(buffer) when prompted for user credentials instead of the designated variable ($user). It then times out. Below is the code:

...
    }
    "yes" {
        send_user "\nEnter your username for the WLC supporting the new APs:\n"
        sleep 6
    }
}
expect {
    -re "(.*)\n" {
        set user $expect_out(1,string)
    }
}
send_user "\nEnter your password for the WLC supporting the new APs:\n"
sleep 15
expect {
    -re "(.*)\n" {
        set pass $expect_out(1,string)
    }
}
sleep 1
send_user "\nSshing to the IP of the WLC supporting the new APs ($wlc_temp)\n"
spawn ssh $wlc_temp

expect {
    "User:" {
        send $user\n
        sleep 1
    }
}
expect {
    "assword:" {
        send $pass\n
        sleep 1
    }
}

Below is the result:

(device hostname) User: (device hostname) User:

Below are the debugs:

Sshing to the IP of the WLC supporting the new APs () spawn ssh parent: waiting for sync byte parent: telling child to go ahead parent: now unsynchronized from child spawn: returns {7153}

expect: does "" (spawn_id exp6) match glob pattern "User:"? no

expect: does "\r\n" (spawn_id exp6) match glob pattern "User:"? no (device hostname) User:

expect: does "\r\n(device hostname) User:" (spawn_id exp6) match glob pattern "User:"? yes expect: set expect_out(0,string) "User:" expect: set expect_out(spawn_id) "exp6" expect: set expect_out(buffer) "\r\n(device hostname) User:" send: sending "\n" to { exp6 }

expect: does " " (spawn_id exp6) match glob pattern "assword:"? no

(device hostname) User:

expect: does "\r\n(device hostname) User:" (spawn_id exp6) match glob pattern "assword:"? no expect: timed out

Update: Relocating the statements requesting user input to the top of the script served as a work around.

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1 Answer

When you want to read input from the user, you should use expect_user instead of expect:

        send_user "\nEnter your username for the WLC supporting the new APs:\n"
        sleep 6
    }
}
expect_user {
    -re "(.*)\n" {
        set user $expect_out(1,string)
    }
}
send_user "\nEnter your password for the WLC supporting the new APs:\n"
sleep 15
expect_user {
    -re "(.*)\n" {
        set pass $expect_out(1,string)
    }
}
sleep 1
send_user "\nSshing to the IP of the WLC supporting the new APs ($wlc_temp)\n"

# ...

(I also think that you could use fewer sleep calls in there, and instead just tune up the timeouts, but that's less likely to have an effect on the correct operation of the script.)

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I made the changes you recommended, but am still seeing the same behavior. –  user1933231 Jun 25 '13 at 16:37
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