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I am trying to make an html page with 2 divs : "top" and "main"

The top <div> must take the place of its contained elements, the main <div> must take all the remaining place.

Here is what I tried:

CSS CODE :

html,body{
  height:100%;
}

#top{
  background-color : red;
  padding:10px;
  border:1px solid;
}

#main{
  background-color : blue;
  height:100%;
  padding:10px;
  border:1px solid;
}

#content1{
  background-color:yellow;
}

#content2{
  background-color:yellow;
  height :100%;
}

HTML CODE:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head></head>
  <body>

    <div id="top">
      <div id="content1">content1</div>
    </div>

    <div id="main">
      <div id="content2">content2</div>
    </div>

  </body>

</html>

Here is the jsFiddle

As you can see, the "100%" I set on "content2" causes this div to take 100% of the page height instead of just the remaining space. Is there a magic css property to fix this?

EDIT:

Thank you for all your solutions.

I finally chose the solution proposed by Riccardo Pasianotto based on CSS properties display:table and display:table-row.

Here is my final HTML CODE:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<body>
  <div id="content1" class="row">
    <div class="subcontent">
      <div class="subContentContainer">
         content1
      </div>
    </div>
  </div>
  <div id="content2" class="row">
    <div class="subcontent">
      <div class="subContentContainer">
        content2
      </div>
    </div>
  </div>    
</body>

Here is the corresponding CSS CODE:

html,body{
  padding:0;
  margin:0;
  height:100%;
  width:100%;
}

body{
  display:table;
}

.row{
  display:table-row;
  width:100%;
}

#top{
  height:100px;
}

#content1{
  background:#aa5555;
  padding:10px;
}

#content2{
  background:#5555AA;
  height:100%;
}

.subcontent{
  padding : 10px;
  height:100%;
}

.subContentContainer{
  background-color:yellow;
  height:100%;
}

And here is the corresponding Jsfiddle.

share|improve this question
    
Why would you like to have your main content stick to the bottom ? Maybe you would like to have a footer at the bottom of the page ? –  Brewal Jun 25 '13 at 8:26
    
You are missing the DOCTYPE in your HTML. –  Uooo Jun 25 '13 at 8:30
    
Later, I will put a border around the yellow zones. Then, If the height of the main content is bigger as the zone, I will put scroll bars. For the user, I think that it's cleaner if the size of this zone never changes. –  Arnaud Denoyelle Jun 25 '13 at 8:32
    
@w4rumy for the sake of simplicity, I did not put it in this example. Is this important in this particular case? –  Arnaud Denoyelle Jun 25 '13 at 8:33
1  
@adenoyelle Missing DOCTYPE means your browser goes into Quirks mode and renders elements differently. Therefore, if anything is not working and the example is missing a DOCTYPE, we are working based on a non-standard HTML document. So I always suggest adding a DOCTYPE first - experience has shown that a lot of bugs disappear then. –  Uooo Jun 25 '13 at 8:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

DEMOJF

For doing this you have to use display:table so edit in that way

html,
body {
  height: 100%;
  width: 100%;
}
body {
  display: table;
}
.row {
  display: table-row;
  width: 100%;
  background: red;
}
#top {
  height: 100px;
}
#content1 {
  background: yellow;
  height: 100%;
}
#content2 {
  overflow: scroll;
  height: 100%;
  border: 1px solid black;
}
<body>

  <div id="top" class="row">
    <div id="content1">content1</div>
  </div>

  <div id="main" class="row">
    <div id="content2">content2</div>
  </div>

</body>

share|improve this answer
    
Starting from your example, I could adapt it to do exactly what I wanted: jsfiddle.net/b2X4r –  Arnaud Denoyelle Jun 25 '13 at 9:19
    
of course! I had no time before! –  rkpasia Jun 25 '13 at 9:20
1  
Updated it to remove fixed size for header : jsfiddle.net/b2X4r/1 –  Arnaud Denoyelle Jun 25 '13 at 9:25

What I often do is making a container without padding to min-height: 100% and let my content have its proper height (auto) :

This will make something like this :

#container {
    background-color : #5555AA;
    min-height: 100%;
}
#content2 {
    background-color:yellow;
    margin: 10px;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/5cEdq/25/

I don't know if this is exactly what you want, but you can't make a div just "fill the remaning space" without making it absolute. What you don't really want either.

share|improve this answer
    
There aren't any better ways of doing this I guess. so this could be the best solution. –  Kees Sonnema Jun 25 '13 at 8:49

try this:

http://jsfiddle.net/5cEdq/16/

CSS :

   html,body{
      height:100%;
      Padding:0; 
      margin:0;
      border:0;}
share|improve this answer
    
The rendering is not correct with both browsers I tried (Chrome and FF on Linux). Is this correct with your browser? –  Arnaud Denoyelle Jun 25 '13 at 8:37
    
doesn't work :P –  Kees Sonnema Jun 25 '13 at 8:43
    
@MrLister: Sorry. I am wrong. I tired setting height for body (I wanted to create an application with footer). But now I see this link: stackoverflow.com/questions/6654958/… –  Yogee Jun 26 '13 at 10:27

Since both Divs are using 100% height set on the html and body tag you only need to set it there then zero your margin and padding. Generally if you have to set a div and its parent div both to 100% height you're overdoing it.

share|improve this answer

Is there a magic css property to fix this?

Yes there is. It's called box-sizing

Read this article for more info about the box-sizing property.

FIDDLE

So if your header was say 64px high, then you'd do something like this:

 .container {
   height: 100%;
   background: pink;
   margin-top: -64px;
   padding-top: 64px;
   -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
   box-sizing: border-box;
 }
<header>header</header>
<div class="container">
  <div class="content">
    content here
  </div>
</div>

share|improve this answer

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