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I read some lines from a file in the following form:

line = a   b  c  d,e,f    g   h  i,j,k,l   m   n

What I want is lines without the ","-separated elements, e.g.,

a   b  c  d    g   h  i   m   n 
a   b  c  d    g   h  j   m   n
a   b  c  d    g   h  k   m   n
a   b  c  d    g   h  l   m   n
a   b  c  e    g   h  i   m   n
a   b  c  e    g   h  j   m   n
a   b  c  e    g   h  k   m   n
a   b  c  e    g   h  l   m   n
.   .  .  .    .   .  .   .   .
.   .  .  .    .   .  .   .   .

First I would split line

sline = line.split()

Now I would iterate over sline and look for elements that can be splited with "," as separator. The Problem is I don't know always how much from those elements I have to expect. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
So, you want to remove a comma and an element after it? How long(in characters) could it be? Could be a space between the comma and the element? –  soon Jun 25 '13 at 8:30
    
It loks like You need to repeat Your line for each of items separated by ,. Am I correct? –  oleg Jun 25 '13 at 8:40
    
@Tengis: could you clarify your question please? Your text suggests that you just want to remove any part of a field after a comma. But your example seems to show that you want to expand any comma-separated field into multiple lines. So which is it, please? –  MiniQuark Jun 25 '13 at 8:58

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using regex, itertools.product and some string formatting:

This solution preserves the initial spacing as well.

>>> import re
>>> from itertools import product
>>> line = 'a   b  c  d,e,f    g   h  i,j,k,l   m   n'
>>> items = [x[0].split(',') for x in re.findall(r'((\w+,)+\w)',line)]
>>> strs = re.sub(r'((\w+,)+\w+)','{}',line)
>>> for prod in product(*items):
...     print (strs.format(*prod))
...     
a   b  c  d    g   h  i   m   n
a   b  c  d    g   h  j   m   n
a   b  c  d    g   h  k   m   n
a   b  c  d    g   h  l   m   n
a   b  c  e    g   h  i   m   n
a   b  c  e    g   h  j   m   n
a   b  c  e    g   h  k   m   n
a   b  c  e    g   h  l   m   n
a   b  c  f    g   h  i   m   n
a   b  c  f    g   h  j   m   n
a   b  c  f    g   h  k   m   n
a   b  c  f    g   h  l   m   n

Another example:

>>> line = 'a   b  c  d,e,f    g   h  i,j,k,l   m   n q,w,e,r  f o   o'
>>> items = [x[0].split(',') for x in re.findall(r'((\w+,)+\w)',line)]
>>> strs = re.sub(r'((\w+,)+\w+)','{}',line)
for prod in product(*items):
    print (strs.format(*prod))
...     
a   b  c  d    g   h  i   m   n q  f o   o
a   b  c  d    g   h  i   m   n w  f o   o
a   b  c  d    g   h  i   m   n e  f o   o
a   b  c  d    g   h  i   m   n r  f o   o
a   b  c  d    g   h  j   m   n q  f o   o
a   b  c  d    g   h  j   m   n w  f o   o
a   b  c  d    g   h  j   m   n e  f o   o
a   b  c  d    g   h  j   m   n r  f o   o
a   b  c  d    g   h  k   m   n q  f o   o
a   b  c  d    g   h  k   m   n w  f o   o
a   b  c  d    g   h  k   m   n e  f o   o
a   b  c  d    g   h  k   m   n r  f o   o
a   b  c  d    g   h  l   m   n q  f o   o
a   b  c  d    g   h  l   m   n w  f o   o
a   b  c  d    g   h  l   m   n e  f o   o
a   b  c  d    g   h  l   m   n r  f o   o
a   b  c  e    g   h  i   m   n q  f o   o
a   b  c  e    g   h  i   m   n w  f o   o
a   b  c  e    g   h  i   m   n e  f o   o
a   b  c  e    g   h  i   m   n r  f o   o
a   b  c  e    g   h  j   m   n q  f o   o
a   b  c  e    g   h  j   m   n w  f o   o
a   b  c  e    g   h  j   m   n e  f o   o
a   b  c  e    g   h  j   m   n r  f o   o
a   b  c  e    g   h  k   m   n q  f o   o
a   b  c  e    g   h  k   m   n w  f o   o
a   b  c  e    g   h  k   m   n e  f o   o
a   b  c  e    g   h  k   m   n r  f o   o
a   b  c  e    g   h  l   m   n q  f o   o
a   b  c  e    g   h  l   m   n w  f o   o
a   b  c  e    g   h  l   m   n e  f o   o
a   b  c  e    g   h  l   m   n r  f o   o
a   b  c  f    g   h  i   m   n q  f o   o
a   b  c  f    g   h  i   m   n w  f o   o
a   b  c  f    g   h  i   m   n e  f o   o
a   b  c  f    g   h  i   m   n r  f o   o
a   b  c  f    g   h  j   m   n q  f o   o
a   b  c  f    g   h  j   m   n w  f o   o
a   b  c  f    g   h  j   m   n e  f o   o
a   b  c  f    g   h  j   m   n r  f o   o
a   b  c  f    g   h  k   m   n q  f o   o
a   b  c  f    g   h  k   m   n w  f o   o
a   b  c  f    g   h  k   m   n e  f o   o
a   b  c  f    g   h  k   m   n r  f o   o
a   b  c  f    g   h  l   m   n q  f o   o
a   b  c  f    g   h  l   m   n w  f o   o
a   b  c  f    g   h  l   m   n e  f o   o
a   b  c  f    g   h  l   m   n r  f o   o
share|improve this answer
1  
Better than mine, as it preserves the whitespace between the items. –  glglgl Jun 25 '13 at 9:17
    
Ouch, this might be a bit dangerous, depending on the kind of data. What if the data contains {} somewhere? If it's really important to keep the original spacing, then I would do it another way. –  MiniQuark Jun 25 '13 at 9:27
    
@MiniQuark In case if the data contains {} somewhere, we can escape them first using {{}}. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jun 25 '13 at 9:28
    
I guess you're right, but it's error-prone. Honestly, I prefer my answer. :-) I edited it to allow keeping the original spacing. –  MiniQuark Jun 25 '13 at 9:40
    
@MiniQuark How is it error prone? It works fine. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jun 25 '13 at 9:49

Your question is not really clear. If you want to strip off any part after commas (as your text suggests), then a fairly readable one-liner should do:

cleaned_line = " ".join([field.split(",")[0] for field in line.split()])

If you want to expand lines containing comma-separated fields into multiple lines (as your example suggests), then you should use the itertools.product function:

import itertools
line = "a   b  c  d,e,f    g   h  i,j,k,l   m   n"
line_fields = [field.split(",") for field in line.split()]
for expanded_line_fields in itertools.product(*line_fields):
    print " ".join(expanded_line_fields)

This is the output:

a b c d g h i m n
a b c d g h j m n
a b c d g h k m n
a b c d g h l m n
a b c e g h i m n
a b c e g h j m n
a b c e g h k m n
a b c e g h l m n
a b c f g h i m n
a b c f g h j m n
a b c f g h k m n
a b c f g h l m n

If it's important to keep the original spacing, for some reason, then you can replace line.split() by re.findall("([^ ]*| *)", line):

import re
import itertools
line = "a   b  c  d,e,f    g   h  i,j,k,l   m   n"
line_fields = [field.split(",") for field in re.findall("([^ ]+| +)", line)]
for expanded_line_fields in itertools.product(*line_fields):
    print "".join(expanded_line_fields)

This is the output:

a   b  c  d    g   h  i   m   n
a   b  c  d    g   h  j   m   n
a   b  c  d    g   h  k   m   n
a   b  c  d    g   h  l   m   n
a   b  c  e    g   h  i   m   n
a   b  c  e    g   h  j   m   n
a   b  c  e    g   h  k   m   n
a   b  c  e    g   h  l   m   n
a   b  c  f    g   h  i   m   n
a   b  c  f    g   h  j   m   n
a   b  c  f    g   h  k   m   n
a   b  c  f    g   h  l   m   n
share|improve this answer
    
I think it does not answer to the question (see example). –  Maxime Jun 25 '13 at 8:50
    
@Maxime: I think it does. "a b c d,e,f g h" => "a b c d g h" –  MiniQuark Jun 25 '13 at 8:52
    
Nope. In the first line you need to print "a b c d g h" and then "a b c e g h" and "a b c f g h". –  Maxime Jun 25 '13 at 8:53
1  
Oh boy, I see what you mean. That's not the way I understood the question, though. I think you're right, but I'll ask Tengis to clarify. He should have said something like "expand comma separated fields". –  MiniQuark Jun 25 '13 at 8:56
    
I updated my answer to take into account both interpretations of the question. –  MiniQuark Jun 25 '13 at 9:16

If I have understood your example correctly You need following

import itertools
sss = "a   b  c  d,e,f    g   h  i,j,k,l   m   n  d,e,f "
coma_separated = [i for i in sss.split() if ',' in i]
spited_coma_separated = [i.split(',') for i in coma_separated]
symbols = (i for i in itertools.product(*spited_coma_separated)) 
                     #use generator statement to save memory
for s in symbols:
    st = sss
    for part, symb in zip(coma_separated, s):
        st = st.replace(part, symb, 1) # To prevent replacement of the 
                                       # same coma separated group replace once 
                                       # for first occurance
    print (st.split()) # for python3 compatibility
share|improve this answer
    
sorry wrong variable name used. should be corrected –  oleg Jun 25 '13 at 8:56
    
Seems complicated but it works. Can you make it work for Python3 too? –  Maxime Jun 25 '13 at 8:57
    
@Maxime, fixed. –  oleg Jun 25 '13 at 9:06

Most other answers only produce one line instead of the multiple lines you seem to want.

To achieve what you want, you can work in several ways.

The recursive solution seems the most intuitive to me:

def dothestuff(l):
    for n, i in enumerate(l):
        if ',' in i:
            # found a "," entry
            items = i.split(',')
            for j in items:
                for rest in dothestuff(l[n+1:]):
                    yield l[:n] + [j] + rest
            return
    yield l


line = "a   b  c  d,e,f    g   h  i,j,k,l   m   n"
for i in dothestuff(line.split()): print i
share|improve this answer
for i in range(len(line)-1):
    if line[i] == ',':
        line = line.replace(line[i]+line[i+1], '')
share|improve this answer
import itertools
line_data = 'a   b  c  d,e,f    g   h  i,j,k,l   m   n'
comma_fields_indices = [i for i,val in enumerate(line_data.split()) if "," in val]
comma_fields = [i.split(",") for i in line_data.split() if "," in i]
all_comb = []
for val in itertools.product(*comma_fields):
    sline_data = line_data.split()
    for index,word in enumerate(val):
        sline_data[comma_fields_indices[index]] = word
    all_comb.append(" ".join(sline_data))
print all_comb
share|improve this answer
    
You probably want " ".join(sline_data) instead of ",".join(sline_data) –  MiniQuark Jun 25 '13 at 9:23
    
@MiniQuark : Hmm, yeah, Thanks –  Nakamura Jun 25 '13 at 9:25
    
What's the use of count? –  Maxime Jun 25 '13 at 12:42
    
@Maxime Hmm, yeah, no need for count. thanks again :) –  Nakamura Jun 25 '13 at 13:30

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