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I want to copy a vector of type Foo objects but the objects can be several different derived types of Foo. I can't figure out how to copy without slicing. Here's my toy code

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <memory>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

class Foo
{
public:
    Foo() { m_x = "abc"; }
    Foo( const Foo &other ) { m_x = other.m_x; }
    virtual std::string ToString() { return m_x; }
    std::string m_x;
};

class FooDerivedA : public Foo
{
public:
    FooDerivedA() : Foo() { m_y = 123; }
    std::string ToString() { return m_x + ", " + std::to_string( m_y ); }
    int m_y;
};

class FooDerivedB : public Foo
{
public:
    FooDerivedB() : Foo() { m_z = true; }
    std::string ToString() { return m_x + ", " + std::to_string( m_z ); }
    bool m_z;
};

class Foos
{
public:
    Foos(){}
    Foos( const Foos &other )
    {
        for ( auto &foo : other.m_Foos )
        {
            // I believe this is slicing. How can I prevent this?
            auto f = std::unique_ptr<Foo>( new Foo( *foo ) ); 
            m_Foos.push_back( std::move( f ) );
        }
    }
    void Add( std::unique_ptr<Foo> foo ) { m_Foos.push_back( std::move( foo ) ); }
    std::string ToString() 
    {
        std::string s;
        for ( auto &foo : m_Foos )
        {
            s += foo->ToString() + "\n";
        }
        return s;
    }
private:
    std::vector<std::unique_ptr<Foo>> m_Foos;
};

int main()
{
    Foos f1;
    f1.Add( std::unique_ptr<FooDerivedA>( new FooDerivedA ) );
    auto f2 = Foos( f1 );
    std::cout << "f1:" << f1.ToString() << std::endl;
    std::cout << "f2:" << f2.ToString() << std::endl;
    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

I can't specify that the type should be FooDerivedA like:

auto f = std::unique_ptr<Foo>( new FooDerivedA( *foo ) ); 

because it might be FooDerivedB. How can I copy the data without slicing?

share|improve this question
    
A few things: 1) WHy are you not calling the superclass constructor in the derived classes? 2) auto may be for the primitive types only (I might be wrong). 3) Is using virtual classes within your use scope? –  hagubear Jun 25 '13 at 8:43
2  
Search for "clone" (example, example) or "virtual copy constructor" (example, example) –  gx_ Jun 25 '13 at 8:46
    
@hagubear Sorry, I just didn't think it was relevant to the example, though you're right that I should have. I'll edit the code. @ gx_ Thanks. I'll look into this. –  Phlox Midas Jun 25 '13 at 8:57
    
@PhloxMidas Useful question though! slicing questions are apparently repeats in stackoverflow and gx_ seems to have pointed us to the right direction. Good luck! –  hagubear Jun 25 '13 at 9:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The classical method to solve this problem is to implement a virtual Foo *clone() const, which is then called instead of the copy constructor.

So, if we have an object of some (derived form of) Foo in x, we can create another one by:

 void someFunc(Foo *x)
 {
     Foo *copy_of_x = x->clone();
     ... 
     delete copy_of_x;  // Important so we don't leak!
 }

Note that since it's a virtual function, we can't call it in the constructor of foo or any of it's derived types, as virtual functions don't operate "correctly" inside constructors.

share|improve this answer
    
This seems backwards: clone calls the copy constructor, and is not called from it (and there is no such thing as an "assignment constructor"). –  James Kanze Jun 25 '13 at 9:25
    
... maybe virtual Foo* clone() const ? Do you also mean the copy constructor of class Foos (it isn't too clear from your answer)? –  user396672 Jun 25 '13 at 10:33

You may consider using Boost.Variant instead of pointers in your container. This avoid a lot of slicing and memory management issues. Also, you get a lot more from default constructors.

Here is a full rework of your example using this design:

#include <vector>
#include <iterator>
#include <string>
#include <boost/variant.hpp>

struct Foo
{
    Foo() : m_x("abc") {}
    std::string m_x;
};

struct FooDerivedA : Foo
{
    FooDerivedA() : m_y(123) {}
    int m_y;
};

struct FooDerivedB : Foo
{
    FooDerivedB() : m_z(true) {}
    bool m_z;
};

typedef boost::variant<FooDerivedA, FooDerivedB> a_foo;

struct to_string : boost::static_visitor<std::string>
{
    std::string operator()(Foo const& foo) const 
        {return foo.m_x;}
    std::string operator()(FooDerivedA const& foo) const
        {return foo.m_x + ", " + std::to_string(foo.m_y);}
    std::string operator()(FooDerivedB const& foo) const
        {return foo.m_x + ", " + std::to_string(foo.m_z);}
};

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, a_foo const& foo)
{
    return os << boost::apply_visitor(to_string(), foo);
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<a_foo> f1;
    f1.push_back(FooDerivedA());
    f1.push_back(FooDerivedB());
    auto f2 = f1;
    std::ostream_iterator<a_foo> out_it(std::cout, "\n");
    std::cout << "f1:" << std::endl;
    std::copy(f1.begin(), f1.end(), out_it);
    std::cout << "f2:" << std::endl;
    std::copy(f2.begin(), f2.end(), out_it);
    return 0;
}
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