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#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
   int a = 10, b = 5, c = 5;
   int d;
   d = b + c == a;
   printf("%d", d);
}

In the above code,could any one please explain to me how d = b + c == a works?

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5  
Yes, any seasoned C programmer could explain it. However, no one wants to google "C operators" for you. You have to do it yourself. –  user529758 Jun 25 '13 at 10:08
1  
This is a platform where i can clear my doubts. So such comments wont help! –  Raja Narayan Jun 25 '13 at 10:21
    
You have to make some research effort. We are not a "gimme teh codez" site. –  user529758 Jun 25 '13 at 10:23
    
Ya agree with you. But if you are not interested please dont answer my question. There are many who can help me. –  Raja Narayan Jun 25 '13 at 10:26
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4 Answers 4

Because of operator precedence, it is parsed as

d = ((b + c) == a);

b + c is 10, which is equal to a, so d receives the value of 1, which is how C represents true comparisons.

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-1 you posted 2 seconds after VoidPointer, don't plagiarize. </irony> –  user529758 Jun 25 '13 at 10:12
    
@H2CO3 Oh you! :-) –  Jim Balter Jun 25 '13 at 10:12
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Based on precedence of operators, binary + has higher precedence than ==. So the statement will be grouped as,

d = ( b + c ) == a;

Which becomes,

d = ( ( b + c ) == a );    // ==>  d = ( 10 == 10 );

So, d holds the truth value based on the comparison (b+c) == a which is 1 because in C comparison operators will return 1 for true and 0 for false.

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Its works like this

d = (b+c) == a --> (5+5) == 10 ---> 1 

Which returns 1

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+ operator has higher precedence than ==.So d=b+c==a; parsed as d=((b+c)==a);. b+c is 10.
so (10==a) evaluates true .So d=1;

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