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is there some way of return null if it can't parse a string to int?

with:

public .... , string? categoryID) 
{
int.TryParse(categoryID, out categoryID);

getting "cannot convert from 'out string' to 'out int'

what to do?

EDIT:

No longer relevant because of asp.net constraints is the way to solve problem

/M

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1  
Why do you parse it to an int when you want to store it in a string?? –  Stefan Steinegger Nov 13 '09 at 14:17
1  
By the way, string is a reference type, so you should not make it nullable. (does this compile anyway?) –  Stefan Steinegger Nov 13 '09 at 14:17
    
I use this for asp.net mvc so the categoryID is mapped from the url, so I get error if i pass in string in url –  Lasse Edsvik Nov 13 '09 at 14:20
    
@Stefan: My guess is that the OP is validating string format using this method as well as enforcing a fixed string format. Therefore, they can parse 10,000 and turn it into 10000, for example. Just a guess though. –  Jeff Yates Nov 13 '09 at 14:29

7 Answers 7

up vote 16 down vote accepted

First of all, why are you trying to parse a string to an int and stick the result back into a string?

The method signature is

bool int.TryParse(string, out int)

so you have to give a variable of type int as second argument. This also means that you won't get null if parsing fails, instead the method will simply return false. But you can easily piece that together:

int? TryParse2(string s) {
    int i;
    if (!int.TryParse(s, out i)) {
        return null;
    } else {
        return i;
    }
}
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Eep, thanks, Garry. Writing code without ever compiling it invites errors such as those :-) –  Joey Nov 13 '09 at 14:24
    
I bet this would make a nice extension method –  cost Jan 20 at 6:50

** this answer was down-voted a lot ** Although it is a possible solution - it is a bad one performance wise, and probably not a good programming choice.

I will not delete it, as I guess many programmers might not be aware of this, so here is an example how not to do things:

use try and catch

try
{
res = Int32.Parse(strVAR)
}
catch(exception ex) 
{
 return null;
}
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1  
Better to use TryParse. –  Jason Nov 13 '09 at 14:18
    
Well, this is still an option.... –  Dani Nov 13 '09 at 14:20
    
Since C# 2.0 came out, TryParse is almost always better than doing exception catching. –  Bomlin Nov 13 '09 at 14:20
2  
Exceptions should not, as a practice, be a part of the normal flow of code. They should be exactly as their name implies, an exception. If you are expecting certain things on a regular basis, you should try to code a solution rather than throwing an exception and handling it. An example is checking if a file exists prior to trying to open it rather than opening a file and catching a file not found exception. So in general, avoid exception programming if you don't need it. In other words, save it for the exceptions... :) –  Bomlin Nov 13 '09 at 14:26
4  
+1 Because although it's incorrect, it does show a valid way that someone could solve a problem such as this. Since the poster edited his answer to show that it was incorrect, and left comments as to why, I see no reason that it should be given such a low ranking. –  DigitalNomad Nov 13 '09 at 15:42

Int is a value type which means there is no such thing as a null int. So no, TryParse will never alter the out parameter so that it is null.

But the problem you're having is you're passing a string to the out parameter of TryParse when its expecting an integer.

You need something like this...

Int categoryID = 0;
string strCategoryID = "somestringmaybeitsaninteger";

int.TryParse(strCategoryID, out categoryID);
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There is a nullable int: int? –  Dani Nov 13 '09 at 14:17
    
Dani: TryParse however, returns int, not Nullable<int>. –  Joey Nov 13 '09 at 14:20
    
int? is not actually an integer type ... it's shorthand for System.Nullable<int>. –  jerhinesmith Nov 13 '09 at 14:21

How about this?

public int? ParseToNull(string categoryId)
{
    int id;
    return int.TryParse(categoryId, out id) ? (int?)id : null;
}
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This solution might benefit from being turned into an extension method. –  Martin Clarke Nov 13 '09 at 14:28
    
It's already an extension method in my app but I didn't know what molgan wanted it for so I kept it as a method. –  DigitalNomad Nov 13 '09 at 14:39
    
you don't need the cast on id there. An int or a null is a valid Nullable<int> :). –  Khanzor Dec 23 '10 at 3:12
1  
@Khanzor: Actually, you do, unless you replace null with new int?(). Otherwise, the type of the conditional cannot be inferred. –  SLaks Dec 23 '10 at 3:36
    
@SLaKs - Ahh, so he does. If you don't use the ternary operator you can avoid the cast though. –  Khanzor Dec 23 '10 at 3:59

Do you want to do something like this?

public int? Parse(string categoryID) 
{
  int value;
  if (int.TryParse(categoryID, out value))
  {
    return value;
  }
  else
  {
    return null;
  }
}
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Here's a proper use of Int32.TryParse:

int? value;
int dummy;
if(Int32.TryParse(categoryID, out dummy)) {
    value = dummy;
}
else {
    value = null;
}
return value;
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3  
Or: value = int.TryParse(categoryID, out dummy) ? dummy : null; –  Dan Tao Nov 13 '09 at 14:55
1  
Yes, absolutely but that's more opaque to a neophyte. –  Jason Nov 13 '09 at 15:04
    
@Dan: won’t compile ;-) But yes, I prefer that solution (plus one cast, to make it compile). –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 13 '09 at 17:44

TryParse will return false if the string can't be parsed. You can use this fact to return either the parsed value, or null. Anyway I guess that you are intending to return int? from your method, then it would be something like this:

public int? ParseInt(string categoryID) 
{
    int theIntValue;
    bool parseOk = int.TryParse(categoryID, out theIntValue);
    if(parseOk) {
        return theIntValue;
    } else {
        return null;
    }
}
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