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I am not sure if I get this well, for example, an if statement in Java is said to be single-entry/single-exit statement. in case of its condition is true is this considered to be its single-entry point and if false is it considered to be its single-exit point?

if(someCondition)
   doSomething();

and what are the examples of non-(single-entry/single-exit) statements?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

One exit point method (single-exit):

public int stringLength(String s) {
  return s.length();
}

Two exit point method:

public int stringLength(String s) {
  if(s == null) {
    return 0;
  }
  return s.length();
}

Below is a quote from Martin Fowler's book Refactoring:

I often find I use Replace Nested Conditional with Guard Clauses when I'm working with a programmer who has been taught to have only one entry point and one exit point from a method. One entry point is enforced by modern languages, and one exit point is really not a useful rule. Clarity is the key principle: if the method is clearer with one exit point, use one exit point; otherwise don't.

and an illustration of the above statement, compare the code of these two methods doing the same:

double getPayAmount() { 
    double result; 
    if (_isDead) result = deadAmount(); 
    else {
        if (_isSeparated) result = separatedAmount(); 
        else {
            if (_isRetired) result = retiredAmount(); 
            else result = normalPayAmount();
        };
    } 
    return result; 
};

and with a few exit points:

double getPayAmount() { 
    if (_isDead) return deadAmount(); 
    if (_isSeparated) return separatedAmount(); 
    if (_isRetired) return retiredAmount();    
    return normalPayAmount();
};

Nested conditional code often is written by programmers who are taught to have one exit point from a method. I've found that is a too simplistic rule. When I have no further interest in a method, I signal my lack of interest by getting out. Directing the reader to look at an empty else block only gets in the way of comprehension.

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It's hard to think of multiple entry points with modern high-level languages what with object-orientation and abstraction and encapsulation; but it's easy to see multiple exits from a method. For example:

    public static int CountCommas(string text)
    {
        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(text))
        {
            return 0;
        }
        if (text.Length == 0)
        {
            return 0;
        }

        int index = 0;
        int result = 0;
        while (index > 0)
        {
            index = text.IndexOf(',', index);
            if (index > 0)
            {
                result++;
            }
        }
        return result;
    }
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Probably an example :

do {


}while()

Or something :

int someMethod() throws Exception {

  try {
    someInt = someComplexOp();
    return someInt;
   }
   catch(Exception e) {
     log.error(e.getMessage(),e);
     throw e;
   }     
} 

Also go through this article.

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