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I am learning coffeescript, and I am wanting to make an script that multiplies the number I put in by PI. The issue is in how to get the HTML5 input to the coffeescript code (actually, in the HTML file it is now javascript).

Coffeescript before compiling:

x = y * Math.PI;
alert(x);

HTML5:

<html>
    <head><title>Coffeescript Test</title></head>
    <body>
        <form action="" method="GET">
    <input type="text" name="input" value="NUMBER">
    <input type="button" name="Solve" value="Equals" onClick="Coffee()">
    <span id="result" />
        </form>

        <div id="Coffeescript">
            <script type="text/javascript">
(function Coffee() {
  var x;
  x = y * Math.PI;
  alert(x);
}).call(this);
</script>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>

The variable "y" is supposed to be the input. How do I get a number from the HTML input box to the new javascript code? If possible, give me coffeescript code instead of javascript.

New code after using Paul D. Waite answer (This code works well):

<html>
    <head><title>Coffeescript Test</title></head>
    <body>
        <div id="Coffeescript">
            <script type="text/javascript">
function coffee() {
  var x;
  x = document.querySelectorAll('input[name="pi_input"]')[0].value * Math.PI;
  alert(x);
}
            </script>
        </div>
<form action="" method="GET">
    <input type="text" name="pi_input" value="NUMBER">
    <input type="button" name="Solve" value="Solve" onClick="coffee()">
    <span id="result"/>
</form>
    </body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
I know that many programmers consider embedded javascript uncustomary, but that is how I like to do my web programming. – Devyn Collier Johnson Jun 25 '13 at 10:56
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You've almost already done it, but:

  1. There doesn't seem to be a reason to call Coffee straight after defining it, so you can remove that bit:

    function Coffee() {
      var x;
      x = y * Math.PI;
      alert(x);
    }
    
  2. The function will need to get the value from the <input> field. Getting a reference to the field is more reliable with a library like jQuery, but I'll give an example using a native function (it won't be available in all browsers):

    function Coffee() {
      var x;
      x = document.querySelectorAll('input[name="input"]')[0].value * Math.PI;
      alert(x);
    }
    

    It might be worth giving the field a more descriptive name.

  3. You might want to include your script in the page before your <input> element, otherwise in theory a user could click on the button before the function is defined.

  4. In JavaScript, there's a convention that only constructor functions (i.e. those intended to be called with the new keyword) should have their name capitalised. So function coffee() might be a better choice.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the suggestion in number 2. I never knew that. I should have known suggestion 1 - thank you again. Could you explain "anonymous function"? How can I make the HTML file give the input to the javascript code? – Devyn Collier Johnson Jun 25 '13 at 11:01
    
@DevynCollierJohnson: sorry, I realised after posting my answer that I hadn't actually answered your question. Answer edited to do so. I also noticed that Coffee actually isn't wrapped in an anonymous function at all (I really need to start reading questions before I answer them!), it's just called straight after being defined. – Paul D. Waite Jun 25 '13 at 11:06
1  
I will try your suggestions in about half-an-hour and I will see how it works. Thanks. – Devyn Collier Johnson Jun 25 '13 at 12:01
1  
Thanks, it works! – Devyn Collier Johnson Jun 25 '13 at 12:22
1  
@DevynCollierJohnson: hurray! – Paul D. Waite Jun 25 '13 at 12:23

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