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I have the following:

class obj
{

    template<typename T>
    inline int foo(T val) const;
};


template<typename T>
int obj::foo(T val)  const
{
    //Do something for PODs
}

template<>
int obj::foo<std::vector<bool>::reference>(std::vector<bool>::reference val) const
{
    //Do something for a boolean in vector of booleans.
}

template<>
int obj::foo<std::string>(std::string var) const
{
    //Do something for string. 
}

When compiling with g++ for FreeBSD, the compiler complains:

In function int obj::foo<std::_Bit_reference>(std::_Bit_reference) const': /path/to/file.h:22: multiple definition of int obj::foo<std::_Bit_reference>(std::_Bit_reference) const' /path/to/file.h:22 first defined here

And the same for std::string:

In function int obj::foo<std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >(std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >) const': etc. etc.

I can't figure out what the problem here is. Can someone please help me out with this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Those:

template<>
int obj::foo<std::vector<bool>::reference>(std::vector<bool>::reference val) const
{
    //Do something for a boolean in vector of booleans.
}

template<>
int obj::foo<std::string>(std::string var) const
{
    //Do something for string. 
}

are specializations and thus function definitions which should be in a .cpp (but keep a declaration in the header) and not in an header. Having them in an header leads to have one definition in each .cpp which includes the header.

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Makes sense, although it's getting compiled on Linux. Going to check it... –  Subway Jun 25 '13 at 11:44
    
You saved my life today! –  Subway Jun 25 '13 at 11:55
    
When moving the definition to the .cpp file, I'd recommend to consider leaving a declaration for each type in the header file. –  Subway Jun 25 '13 at 13:05
    
@Subway, good point, I've added it to the answer. –  AProgrammer Jun 25 '13 at 13:29

Get rid of the semicolon at the end of int obj::foo(T val) const;

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Saran, Thank you. –  Subway Jun 25 '13 at 11:45
    
I took a quick glance at your original code and thought that the problem was that int obj::foo(T val) const; was been treated as a redeclaration of the function, but apparently there is something else going on here as well. Whoops. –  Saran Jun 25 '13 at 12:00

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