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What is wrong in this error ?

alter table INFO add constraint chk_app check (CASE WHEN app IS NULL THEN app = 'A');

If its because app = 'A' I am calling it twice then how to have a check constraint to check if app is null then it should have value A

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1  
A check constraint checks something, you need a comparison operator (also a CASE statement needs an END). If you just want to ensure that if app is null then it should be A then you should use wolφi's answer. –  Ben Jun 25 '13 at 11:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want to set the column app to 'A' whenever a row is inserted with a NULL value, I'd use a DEFAULT construct:

 ALTER TABLE info MODIFY (app VARCHAR2(xxx) DEFAULT 'A');

If no value is specified during an INSERT, an 'A' is inserted into column app. Of course, a user can override this behaviour by explicitly inserting a NULL value. This can be prevented by a NOT NULL constraint:

 ALTER TABLE info MODIFY (app VARCHAR2(xxx) DEFAULT 'A' NOT NULL);

From Oracle version 12c on, you can specify the required behaviour more clearly:

 ALTER TABLE info MODIFY (app VARCHAR2(xxx) DEFAULT ON NULL 'A' NOT NULL); 
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This is not the best answer, see Petr's answer, i made an example: sqlfiddle.com/#!4/78aaa/1 –  Pavel Hodek Jun 25 '13 at 13:03

This is bacause check constraint only checks the value, it is not able to change it.

You can simply add default value to app column or write before insert or update trigger like this

create or replace trigger info_briu
before insert or update of info
for each row
begin
  if :new.app is null then
    :new.app := 'A';
  end if;
end;
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1  
A trigger is massive overkill for this situation. –  Ben Jun 25 '13 at 11:49
    
Maybe, but if the insert supplies a null value for the column then a default value is not going to be applied. Of course the insert would not do that. –  David Aldridge Jun 25 '13 at 12:35
    
yes, I agree with Ben in most cases. but is does not help in cases when user directly stores null value, like INSERT INTO info(app) VALUES (NULL) –  Petr Pribyl Jun 25 '13 at 12:36
    
Petr is right - trigger is (imo) only working solution here, see an example, what is wrong with DEFAULT constraint solution: sqlfiddle.com/#!4/78aaa/1 –  Pavel Hodek Jun 25 '13 at 13:04
1  
@Ben: Yes declaring NOT NULL is here the win - simple and good. It could be the content of your first comment - don't complain without alternatives :) –  Pavel Hodek Jun 25 '13 at 14:02

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