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I have a huge tab-separated file formatted like this

X column1 column2 column3
row1 0 1 2
row2 3 4 5
row3 6 7 8
row4 9 10 11

I would like to transpose it in an efficient way using only bash commands (I could write a ten or so lines Perl script to do that, but it should be slower to execute than the native bash functions). So the output should look like

X row1 row2 row3 row4
column1 0 3 6 9
column2 1 4 7 10
column3 2 5 8 11

I thought of a solution like this

cols=`head -n 1 input | wc -w`
for (( i=1; i <= $cols; i++))
do cut -f $i input | tr $'\n' $'\t' | sed -e "s/\t$/\n/g" >> output
done

But it's slow and doesn't seem the most efficient solution. I've seen a solution for vi in this post, but it's still over-slow. Any thoughts/suggestions/brilliant ideas? :-)

share|improve this question
7  
What makes you think that there would exist a bash script that's going to be faster than a Perl script? This is exactly the kind of problem that Perl excells in. –  Mark Pim Nov 13 '09 at 15:16
    
@mark, if its pure bash, it might to faster than chaining all those cut/sed etc tools together. But then again, if you define "bash" as in combining tools, then just writing an awk script will be comparable to Perl wrt text processing. –  ghostdog74 Nov 13 '09 at 15:41
    
Add another for not understanding how perl would be slow here. Slow to write the code? Slow to execute? I genuinely dislike perl, but it does excel at this sort of task. –  Corey Porter Nov 13 '09 at 17:25
    
If your columns/fields have a fixed size/width, then you can use Python file seek to avoid reading your file into memory. Do you have fixed column/field sizes/widths? –  tommy.carstensen Apr 7 '13 at 23:09

15 Answers 15

up vote 37 down vote accepted

gawk

awk '
{ 
    for (i=1; i<=NF; i++)  {
        a[NR,i] = $i
    }
}
NF>p { p = NF }
END {    
    for(j=1; j<=p; j++) {
        str=a[1,j]
        for(i=2; i<=NR; i++){
            str=str" "a[i,j];
        }
        print str
    }
}' file

output

$ more file
0 1 2
3 4 5
6 7 8
9 10 11

$ ./shell.sh
0 3 6 9
1 4 7 10
2 5 8 11

Performance against Perl solution by Jonathan on a 10000 lines file

$ head -5 file
1 0 1 2
2 3 4 5
3 6 7 8
4 9 10 11
1 0 1 2

$  wc -l < file
10000

$ time perl test.pl file >/dev/null

real    0m0.480s
user    0m0.442s
sys     0m0.026s

$ time awk -f test.awk file >/dev/null

real    0m0.382s
user    0m0.367s
sys     0m0.011s

$ time perl test.pl file >/dev/null

real    0m0.481s
user    0m0.431s
sys     0m0.022s

$ time awk -f test.awk file >/dev/null

real    0m0.390s
user    0m0.370s
sys     0m0.010s
share|improve this answer
    
And now to handle row and column labels too? –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 13 '09 at 15:54
1  
no requirement for that. –  ghostdog74 Nov 13 '09 at 17:14
    
OK - you're correct; your sample data doesn't match the question's sample data, but your code works fine on the question's sample data and gives the required output (give or take blank vs tab spacing). Mainly my mistake. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 13 '09 at 17:20
    
Interesting timings - I agree you see a performance benefit in awk. I was using MacOS X 10.5.8, which does not use 'gawk'; and I was using Perl 5.10.1 (32-bit build). I gather that your data was 10000 lines with 4 columns per line? Anyway, it doesn't matter a great deal; both awk and perl are viable solutions (and the awk solution is neater - the 'defined' checks in my Perl are necessary for warning free runs under strict/warnings) and neither is a slouch and both are likely to be way faster than the original shell script solution. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 16 '09 at 9:43
    
yes, my data is just repetition till 10000 lines. –  ghostdog74 Nov 16 '09 at 9:48

A Python solution:

python -c "import sys; print('\n'.join(' '.join(c) for c in zip(*(l.split() for l in sys.stdin.readlines() if l.strip()))))" < input > output

The above is based on the following:

import sys

for c in zip(*(l.split() for l in sys.stdin.readlines() if l.strip())):
    print(' '.join(c))

This code does assume that every line has the same number of columns (no padding is performed).

share|improve this answer
1  
One minor problem here: Replace l.split() by l.strip().split() (Python 2.7), else the last line of the output is crippled. Works for arbitrary column separators, use l.strip().split(sep) and sep.join(c) if your separator is stored in variable sep. –  krlmlr Oct 2 '12 at 4:18
    
This solution reads everything into memory... –  tommy.carstensen May 20 '13 at 23:09

Pure BASH, no additional process. A nice exercise:

declare -a array=( )                      # we build a 1-D-array

read -a line < "$1"                       # read the headline

COLS=${#line[@]}                          # save number of columns

index=0
while read -a line ; do
    for (( COUNTER=0; COUNTER<${#line[@]}; COUNTER++ )); do
    	array[$index]=${line[$COUNTER]}
    	((index++))
    done
done < "$1"

for (( ROW = 0; ROW < COLS; ROW++ )); do
  for (( COUNTER = ROW; COUNTER < ${#array[@]}; COUNTER += COLS )); do
    printf "%s\t" ${array[$COUNTER]}
  done
  printf "\n" 
done
share|improve this answer
    
This worked for my file, although interestingly it prints out a directory listing for the first line of the table. I don't know enough BASH to figure out why. –  bugloaf Jun 19 '13 at 19:50
    
@bugloaf your table has a * in the corner. –  Hello71 Aug 27 at 23:26
    
@bugloaf: Properly quoting variables should prevent that: printf "%s\t" "${array[$COUNTER]}" –  Dennis Williamson Nov 26 at 16:12

the transpose project on sourceforge is a coreutil-like C program for exactly that.

gcc transpose.c -o transpose
./transpose -t input > output #works with stdin, too.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the link. However, it requires too much memory, when dealing with large matrices/files. –  tommy.carstensen Apr 8 '13 at 9:41
    
it has arguments for blocksize and fieldsize: try tweaking the -b and -f arguments. –  flying sheep Apr 8 '13 at 14:54
    
Default block size (--block or -b) is 10kb and default field size (--fieldmax or -f) is 64, so that can't be it. I tried. Thanks for the suggestion though. –  tommy.carstensen Apr 10 '13 at 16:27

If you have sc installed, you can do:

psc -r < inputfile | sc -W% - > outputfile
share|improve this answer
1  
Note that this supports a limited number of lines because sc names its columns as one or a combination of two characters. The limit is 26 + 26^2 = 702. –  Thor Nov 8 '12 at 10:38

Here is a moderately solid Perl script to do the job. There are many structural analogies with @ghostdog74's awk solution.

#!/bin/perl -w
#
# SO 1729824

use strict;

my(%data);          # main storage
my($maxcol) = 0;
my($rownum) = 0;
while (<>)
{
    my(@row) = split /\s+/;
    my($colnum) = 0;
    foreach my $val (@row)
    {
        $data{$rownum}{$colnum++} = $val;
    }
    $rownum++;
    $maxcol = $colnum if $colnum > $maxcol;
}

my $maxrow = $rownum;
for (my $col = 0; $col < $maxcol; $col++)
{
    for (my $row = 0; $row < $maxrow; $row++)
    {
        printf "%s%s", ($row == 0) ? "" : "\t",
                defined $data{$row}{$col} ? $data{$row}{$col} : "";
    }
    print "\n";
}

With the sample data size, the performance difference between perl and awk was negligible (1 millisecond out of 7 total). With a larger data set (100x100 matrix, entries 6-8 characters each), perl slightly outperformed awk - 0.026s vs 0.042s. Neither is likely to be a problem.


Representative timings for Perl 5.10.1 (32-bit) vs awk (version 20040207 when given '-V') vs gawk 3.1.7 (32-bit) on MacOS X 10.5.8 on a file containing 10,000 lines with 5 columns per line:

Osiris JL: time gawk -f tr.awk xxx  > /dev/null

real    0m0.367s
user    0m0.279s
sys 0m0.085s
Osiris JL: time perl -f transpose.pl xxx > /dev/null

real    0m0.138s
user    0m0.128s
sys 0m0.008s
Osiris JL: time awk -f tr.awk xxx  > /dev/null

real    0m1.891s
user    0m0.924s
sys 0m0.961s
Osiris-2 JL:

Note that gawk is vastly faster than awk on this machine, but still slower than perl. Clearly, your mileage will vary.

share|improve this answer
    
on my system, gawk outperforms perl. you can see my results in my edited post –  ghostdog74 Nov 16 '09 at 9:34
1  
conclusion gathered: different platform, different software version, different results. –  ghostdog74 Nov 16 '09 at 16:11

A hackish perl solution can be like this. It's nice because it doesn't load all the file in memory, prints intermediate temp files, and then uses the all-wonderful paste

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my $counter;
open INPUT, "<$ARGV[0]" or die ("Unable to open input file!");
while (my $line = <INPUT>) {
    chomp $line;
    my @array = split ("\t",$line);
    open OUTPUT, ">temp$." or die ("unable to open output file!");
    print OUTPUT join ("\n",@array);
    close OUTPUT;
    $counter=$.;
}
close INPUT;

# paste files together
my $execute = "paste ";
foreach (1..$counter) {
    $execute.="temp$counter ";
}
$execute.="> $ARGV[1]";
system $execute;
share|improve this answer
    
using paste and temp files are just extra unnecessary operations. you can just do manipulation inside memory itself, eg arrays/hashes –  ghostdog74 Nov 13 '09 at 17:11
1  
Yep, but wouldn't that mean keeping everything in memory? The files I'm dealing with are around 2-20gb in size. –  Federico Giorgi Nov 16 '09 at 11:49

The only improvement I can see to your own example is using awk which will reduce the number of processes that are run and the amount of data that is piped between them:

/bin/rm output 2> /dev/null

cols=`head -n 1 input | wc -w` 
for (( i=1; i <= $cols; i++))
do
  awk '{printf ("%s%s", tab, $'$i'); tab="\t"} END {print ""}' input
done >> output
share|improve this answer

I used fgm's solution (thanks fgm!), but needed to eliminate the tab characters at the end of each row, so modified the script thus:

#!/bin/bash 
declare -a array=( )                      # we build a 1-D-array

read -a line < "$1"                       # read the headline

COLS=${#line[@]}                          # save number of columns

index=0
while read -a line; do
    for (( COUNTER=0; COUNTER<${#line[@]}; COUNTER++ )); do
        array[$index]=${line[$COUNTER]}
        ((index++))
    done
done < "$1"

for (( ROW = 0; ROW < COLS; ROW++ )); do
  for (( COUNTER = ROW; COUNTER < ${#array[@]}; COUNTER += COLS )); do
    printf "%s" ${array[$COUNTER]}
    if [ $COUNTER -lt $(( ${#array[@]} - $COLS )) ]
    then
        printf "\t"
    fi
  done
  printf "\n" 
done
share|improve this answer

Not very elegant, but this "single-line" command solves the problem quickly:

cols=4; for((i=1;i<=$cols;i++)); do awk '{print $'$i'}' input | tr '\n' ' '; echo; done

Here cols is the number of columns, where you can replace 4 by head -n 1 input | wc -w.

share|improve this answer

I was just looking for similar bash tranpose but with support for padding. Here is the script I wrote based on fgm's solution, that seem to work. If it can be of help...

#!/bin/bash 
declare -a array=( )                      # we build a 1-D-array
declare -a ncols=( )                      # we build a 1-D-array containing number of elements of each row

SEPARATOR="\t";
PADDING="";
MAXROWS=0;
index=0
indexCol=0
while read -a line; do
    ncols[$indexCol]=${#line[@]};
((indexCol++))
if [ ${#line[@]} -gt ${MAXROWS} ]
    then
         MAXROWS=${#line[@]}
    fi    
    for (( COUNTER=0; COUNTER<${#line[@]}; COUNTER++ )); do
        array[$index]=${line[$COUNTER]}
        ((index++))

    done
done < "$1"

for (( ROW = 0; ROW < MAXROWS; ROW++ )); do
  COUNTER=$ROW;
  for (( indexCol=0; indexCol < ${#ncols[@]}; indexCol++ )); do
if [ $ROW -ge ${ncols[indexCol]} ]
    then
      printf $PADDING
    else
  printf "%s" ${array[$COUNTER]}
fi
if [ $((indexCol+1)) -lt ${#ncols[@]} ]
then
  printf $SEPARATOR
    fi
    COUNTER=$(( COUNTER + ncols[indexCol] ))
  done
  printf "\n" 
done
share|improve this answer

I was looking for a solution to transpose any kind of matrix (nxn or mxn) with any kind of data (numbers or data) and got the following solution:

Row2Trans=number1
Col2Trans=number2

for ((i=1; $i <= Line2Trans; i++));do
    for ((j=1; $j <=Col2Trans ; j++));do
        awk -v var1="$i" -v var2="$j" 'BEGIN { FS = "," }  ; NR==var1 {print $((var2)) }' $ARCHIVO >> Column_$i
    done
done

paste -d',' `ls -mv Column_* | sed 's/,//g'` >> $ARCHIVO
share|improve this answer

Here's a Haskell solution. When compiled with -O2, it runs slightly faster than ghostdog's awk and slightly slower than Stephan's thinly wrapped c python on my machine for repeated "Hello world" input lines. Unfortunately GHC's support for passing command line code is non-existent as far as I can tell, so you will have to write it to a file yourself. It will truncate the rows to the length of the shortest row.

transpose :: [[a]] -> [[a]]
transpose = foldr (zipWith (:)) (repeat [])

main :: IO ()
main = interact $ unlines . map unwords . transpose . map words . lines
share|improve this answer

If you only want to grab a single (comma delimited) line N out of a file and turn it into a column:

head -N file | tail -1 | tr ',' '\n'

share|improve this answer

Here is a bash one-liner that is based on simply converting each line to a column and pasteing them together:

echo '' >tmp1;  cat m.txt |while read l ; do paste tmp1 <(echo $l | tr -s ' ' \\n)>tmp2; cp tmp2 tmp1; done; cat tmp1

m.txt:

0 1 2
4 5 6
7 8 9
10 11 12
  1. creates tmp1 file so it's not empty.

  2. reads each line and transforms it into a column using tr

  3. pastes the new column to the tmp1 file

  4. copies result back into tmp1.

ps.: I really wanted to use io-descriptors but couldn't get them to work.

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