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I am fairly new to Rails and I would really appreciate some pointers in the right direction. I understand the pros and cons of STI.

What would be the best practices for modeling AR-relations with a combination of Single table inheritance and polymorphic associations in Rails 3.2? By deciding to use both would there be any important downsides of this appproach? Would Rails 4 change things?

I have the following models so far:

    class Course
      has_many :participants, class_name: 'User'
      has_many :events, as: :eventable
    end

    class User
      has_many :events, as: :eventable
      has_many :courses
    end

    class Resource
      has_many :events, as: :eventable
    end

    class Subject < Resource
    end

    class Location < Resource
    end

    class Medium < Resource
    end

    class Event
      belongs_to :eventable, polymorphic: true
    end

Looks relatively easy so far, but I am struggling with the complex associations. How would I setup the following associations with STI?

  • a course can have many resources (as subjects/locations)
  • a user can have many resources (as subjects/locations)
  • a resource can have many users (as contacts)
  • an event itself can have additional users (as teachers)
  • an event itself can have additional resources (as locations/subjects/medias)

Examples for what I would like to retrieve from the database

  • all events for a user
  • all events for a course
  • all combined events (user and course) for a participant
  • all associated resources of type location from an event
  • all associated teachers from an event
  • all resources of type location from a course
  • all resources of type subject from a user

TIA and best regards

Chris

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closed as not constructive by Rene Pot, chollida, Mike, NT3RP, Andrew Barber Jun 25 '13 at 16:19

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I am a new user of Stackoverflow (but reading the site for years). I am disappointed that my first questions gets marked as closed. –  Chris Jun 25 '13 at 18:46
    
I tried to be concise and make it a general question concerning STI and polymorphic associations. To make the problem better to understand I had to quote a specific example. I would think my question and the first answer may help other people, who are trying to unterstand the connection between STI and polymorphic relations ins Rails. –  Chris Jun 25 '13 at 18:51
    
Chris, I believe your question is too broad. It would be better to, for example, show code you already have and ask then how to set up a certain, specific, association. What have you tried already? Your question will likely solicit general answers on approaches, which might then generate discussions etc. Which would make SO more of a forum, than a Q&A site. –  Peter Jun 26 '13 at 8:56
    
Thanks for your comment, Peter. I can understand that and I'll try to make my Q more specific. Can I do this right here or do I have to open a new Q. Is it still possible to edit the answer from Arjan (which I did, but don't see any changes). –  Chris Jun 26 '13 at 12:06
    
Cool that you're willing to edit your question! This is indeed the way to go on SO. You should have an edit-link just under the tags of your question. Click on it and you can edit your question. This will also trigger a vote-to-reopen and users with enough reputation will be able to remove the 'on-hold' status of your question. You cannot edit someone elses answer because you're a new user and don't have enough reputation (3 at the moment). It requires 2000 rep. Don't worry, you can add your comment in the comments section (like you did) and Arjan can change his answer accordingly. –  Peter Jun 26 '13 at 12:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You would use those, and some more of Rails' magic :)

class Course
  has_many :participants, class_name: 'User'
  has_many :subjects, conditions: ['type = ?', 'Subject']
  has_many :locations, conditions: ['type = ?', 'Location']
  has_many :events, as: :eventable
end

class User
  has_many :subjects, conditions: ['type = ?', 'Subject']
  has_many :locations, conditions: ['type = ?', 'Location']
  has_many :events, as: :eventable

  belongs_to :event, foreign_key: :teacher_id
end

class Resource
  has_many :contacts, class_name: 'User'
  has_many :events, as: :eventable
end

class Event
  belongs_to :eventable, polymorphic: true
  has_many :teachers, class_name: 'User'

  has_many :subjects, conditions: ['type = ?', 'Subject']
  has_many :locations, conditions: ['type = ?', 'Location']
  has_many :media, conditions: ['type = ?', 'Medium']
end

I think this covers all of your use cases.

note: You should probably rename your model from Media to Medium since Rails works better with singularized model names and you might run into some issues if you don't.

share|improve this answer
    
Great answer, thank you very much. I would like to edit your answer just to make it complete: show the empty subclasses of resources, and show that "user has many courses". –  Chris Jun 25 '13 at 18:40

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