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I am trying to build a function in C/C++ to sort an array and replace each value with its "score" or rank. It takes in a double pointer array to an array of ints, and sorts the double pointers based on the dereferenced value of the integers. I have tried quite a few times to make it work, but can't get it down. Once again, it must sort the double pointers based on the values they point to. This is what I have:

void SortArray( int ** pArray, int ArrayLength )
{
  int i, j, flag = 1;     // set flag to 1 to begin initial pass
  int * temp;             // holding variable orig with no *
  for(i = 1; (i <= ArrayLength) && flag; i++)
  {
    flag = 0;
    for (j = 0; j < (ArrayLength -1); j++)
    {
        if (*pArray[j+1] > *pArray[j])    // ascending order simply changes to <
        { 
            temp = &pArray[j];            // swap elements
            pArray[j] = &pArray[j+1];
            pArray[j+1] = &temp;
            flag = 1;                     // indicates that a swap occurred.
        }
    }
  }
};
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See also stackoverflow.com/questions/5632832/… in which I give two examples. Using O(log(n)) and not O(N^2) –  elcuco Jan 1 '13 at 9:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're close. You're referencing the address of the array items when you swap, which isn't necessary. The items in the array are pointers, and that's what needs to be swapped.

See below:

void SortArray( int ** pArray, int ArrayLength )
{
    int i, j, flag = 1;    // set flag to 1 to begin initial pass
    int * temp;             // holding variable orig with no *
    for(i = ArrayLength - 1; i > 0 && flag; i--)
    {
        flag = 0;
        for (j = 0; j < i; j++)
        {
            if (*pArray[j] > *pArray[j+1])      // ascending order simply changes to <
            { 
                temp = pArray[j];             // swap elements
                pArray[j] = pArray[j+1];
                pArray[j+1] = temp;
                flag = 1;               // indicates that a swap occurred.
            }
        }
    }
}

Also, check out this lovely blog post on Bubble Sorting in case you're interested (sorry, shameless plug :)). Hope that helps you with your homework ;)


Edit: Note the subtle "optimisation" where you count back from the array length and only increment up until 'i' in the inner loop. This saves you from needlessly reparsing items that have already been sorted.

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Heh, this isnt homework.

If thats the case then consider using the STL to manage arrays and sort. Its easier to develop and maintain and the std::sort algorithm is asymptotically faster than bubble sort.

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You should consider using std::swap() to do your swapping. If you do, call it as such:

swap( obj1, obj2 );

rather than:

std::swap( obj1, obj2 );

As the first calling semantic will allow the proper namespace lookup to find the correct overload if one exists. Be sure to have either:

using namespace std;

or:

using std::swap;

somewhere.

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Hmm, I don't have much experience with the STL. Could you give an example?

This program creates a vector of ints, sorts it, and displays the results.

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    vector<int>; vec;
    vec.push_back(7);
    vec.push_back(5);
    vec.push_back(13);
    sort(vec.begin(), vec.end());

    for (vector<int>::size_type i = 0; i < vec.size(); ++i)
    {
        cout << vec[i] << endl;
    }
}
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To complete Brian Ensink's post, you'll find the STL full of surprises. For example, the std::sort algorithm:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

void printArray(const std::vector<int *> & p_aInt)
{
   for(std::vector<int *>::size_type i = 0, iMax = p_aInt.size(); i < iMax; ++i)
   {
      std::cout << "i[" << static_cast<int>(i) << "] = " << reinterpret_cast<unsigned     int>(p_aInt[i]) << std::endl ;
   }

   std::cout << std::endl ;
}


int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
   int a = 1 ;
   int b = 2 ;
   int c = 3 ;
   int d = 4 ;
   int e = 5 ;

   std::vector<int *> aInt ;

   // We fill the vector with variables in an unordered way
   aInt.push_back(&c) ;
   aInt.push_back(&b) ;
   aInt.push_back(&e) ;
   aInt.push_back(&d) ;
   aInt.push_back(&a) ;

   printArray(aInt) ; // We see the addresses are NOT ordered
   std::sort(aInt.begin(), aInt.end()) ; // DO THE SORTING
   printArray(aInt) ; // We see the addresses are ORDERED

   return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

The first printing of the array will show unordered addresses. The second, after the sort, will show ordered adresses. On my compiler, we have:

i[0] = 3216087168
i[1] = 3216087172
i[2] = 3216087160
i[3] = 3216087164
i[4] = 3216087176

i[0] = 3216087160
i[1] = 3216087164
i[2] = 3216087168
i[3] = 3216087172
i[4] = 3216087176

Give STL's <algorithm> header a look http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/algorithm/ You'll find a lot of utilities. Note that you have other implementation of containers that could suit you better (std::list? std::map?).

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