Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to list all elements in my <product> item, because the elements of <product> is variable.

XML file :

<catalog>
   <product>
      <element1>text 1</element1>
      <element2>text 2</element2>
      <element..>text ..</element..>
   </produc>
</catalog>

Python parser : I use fast_iter because my xml file is large...

import lxml.etree as etree
import configs.application as configs

myfile = configs.application.tmp + '/xml_hug_file.xml'

def fast_iter(context, func, *args, **kwargs):
    for event, elem in context:
        func(elem, *args, **kwargs)
        elem.clear()
        while elem.getprevious() is not None:
            del elem.getparent()[0]
    del context

def process_element(catalog):
    print("List all element of <product>")

context = etree.iterparse(myfile, tag='catalog', events = ('end', ))
fast_iter(context, process_element)
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by John Zwinck, Robᵩ, Rene Pot, Justin, Lex Jun 25 '13 at 14:51

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Do you have a question? –  John Zwinck Jun 25 '13 at 13:46
    
how can I list all elements in my product item ? –  Benabra Jun 25 '13 at 13:47
    
What do you mean by "list"? Do you mean print them on standard out? Do you mean create a list, the members of which are the related to your <element...>? –  Robᵩ Jun 25 '13 at 13:57
    
For large xml, ET already provides a function called iterparse. I guess you should also have a look at that! –  Atmaram Shetye Jun 25 '13 at 14:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
def process_element(catalog, *args, **kwargs):
    for child in catalog.getchildren():
        print(child.text)
share|improve this answer

You could use the XPath 'product/*[starts-with(local-name(),"element")]':


import lxml.etree as ET
import io

content = '''\
<catalog>
   <product>
      <element1>text 1</element1>
      <element2>text 2</element2>
      <element3>text ..</element3>
   </product>
</catalog>'''

def fast_iter(context, func, *args, **kwargs):
    """
    http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/xml/library/x-hiperfparse/
    Author: Liza Daly
    See also http://effbot.org/zone/element-iterparse.htm
    """
    for event, elem in context:
        func(elem, *args, **kwargs)
        # It's safe to call clear() here because no descendants will be
        # accessed
        elem.clear()
        # Also eliminate now-empty references from the root node to elem
        for ancestor in elem.xpath('ancestor-or-self::*'):
            while ancestor.getprevious() is not None:
                del ancestor.getparent()[0]
    del context


def process_element(catalog):
    for elt in catalog.xpath('product/*[starts-with(local-name(),"element")]'):
        print(elt)

context = ET.iterparse(io.BytesIO(content), tag='catalog', events = ('end', ))
fast_iter(context, process_element)

yields

<Element element1 at 0xb7449374>
<Element element2 at 0xb744939c>
<Element element3 at 0xb74493c4>

By the way, I made an alteration to Liz Daly's fast_iter, which will delete more elements as they become unused. This should reduce memory requirements when parsing large XML files.

Here is a example which shows how the modified fast_iter above removes more elements than the original fast_iter:

import logging
import textwrap
import lxml.etree as ET
import io

logger = logging.getLogger(__name__)
level = logging.INFO
# level = logging.DEBUG  # uncomment to see more debugging information
logging.basicConfig(level=level)

def fast_iter(context, func, *args, **kwargs):
    """
    http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/xml/library/x-hiperfparse/
    Author: Liza Daly
    See also http://effbot.org/zone/element-iterparse.htm
    """
    for event, elem in context:
        logger.debug('Processing {e}'.format(e=ET.tostring(elem)))
        func(elem, *args, **kwargs)
        # It's safe to call clear() here because no descendants will be
        # accessed
        logger.debug('Clearing {e}'.format(e=ET.tostring(elem)))
        elem.clear()
        # Also eliminate now-empty references from the root node to elem
        for ancestor in elem.xpath('ancestor-or-self::*'):
            logger.debug('Checking ancestor: {a}'.format(a=ancestor.tag))
            while ancestor.getprevious() is not None:
                logger.info('Deleting {p}'.format(
                    p=(ancestor.getparent()[0]).tag))
                del ancestor.getparent()[0]
    del context

def orig_fast_iter(context, func, *args, **kwargs):
    for event, elem in context:
        logger.debug('Processing {e}'.format(e=ET.tostring(elem)))
        func(elem, *args, **kwargs)
        logger.debug('Clearing {e}'.format(e=ET.tostring(elem)))
        elem.clear()
        while elem.getprevious() is not None:
            logger.info('Deleting {p}'.format(
                p=(elem.getparent()[0]).tag))                
            del elem.getparent()[0]
    del context

def setup_ABC():
    content = textwrap.dedent('''\
      <root>
        <A1>
          <B1></B1>
          <C>1<D1></D1></C>
          <E1></E1>
        </A1>
        <A2>
          <B2></B2>
          <C>2<D></D></C>
          <E2></E2>
        </A2>
      </root>
        ''')
    return content

content = setup_ABC()
context = ET.iterparse(io.BytesIO(content), events=('end', ), tag='C')
orig_fast_iter(context, lambda elem: None)
# DEBUG:__main__:Deleting B1
# DEBUG:__main__:Deleting B2

print('-'*80)
"""
The improved fast_iter deletes A1. The original fast_iter does not.
"""
content = setup_ABC()
context = ET.iterparse(io.BytesIO(content), events=('end', ), tag='C')
fast_iter(context, lambda elem: None)
# DEBUG:__main__:Deleting B1
# DEBUG:__main__:Deleting A1
# DEBUG:__main__:Deleting B2

Thus you see the modified fast_iter manages to delete the A1 element because it is not needed by the time the second C element is processed. The original fast_iter only deletes parents of C elements (i.e. B elements). You could imagine things like A1 could be quite large in a large XML file, and there could be many such elements. So the modified fast_iter will allow reclamation of a lot of memory that the original fast_iter does not free.

share|improve this answer

This the solution to my problem :

def process_element(catalog):
    for product in catalog.findall('product'):
        for element in product.findall('*'):
            print(element.tag)
            print(element.text)
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.