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What is the advantage (if one exists) to assigning a variable in the header of a function or constructor? In other words, what is the difference between the following two sets of code and why would I prefer one over the other?

Example 1:

class A {
 private:
  char* b;
 public:
  A(size_t var = 8*1024*1024) {
    ...
    b = new char[var];
    ...
  }
  ...
};

Example 2:

class A {
 private:
  char* b;
 public:
  A() {
    const size_t var = 8*1024*1024;
    ...
    b = new char[var];
    ...
  }
  ...
};

I appreciate any constructive input.

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1  
One allows you to set the size of the array data member and the other one doesn't. –  juanchopanza Jun 25 '13 at 14:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

That is a default argument. It allows the caller to call the function without passing an argument, in which case the default value is used.

So in the first example, one could call:

A* myADefault = new A(); // creates A with default value (8*1024*1024)
A* myLargerA = new A(16*1024*1024); // creates A passing 16*1024*1024 instead of the default

(for more info, look at the "Default values in parameters" section in this tutorial: http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/functions2/)

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Why all the pointers and new? –  juanchopanza Jun 25 '13 at 14:22
    
@juanchopanza I just wanted to be explicit about calling the constructor. I was going to just have A a(); to explicitly show that the constructor is called without arguments, but then I got confused if that would be interpreted as a function declaration by the compiler... :P –  filipe Jun 25 '13 at 14:28
1  
Ah OK, I see. You can use {} in C++11, that avoids the vexing parse. You can also say A a = A() and so on. –  juanchopanza Jun 25 '13 at 14:29

But neither case is particularly good. Member variables should be initialized in constructor initialization lists. That is the only way to initialize a const member variable, for example.

class A {
     private:
         char* b;
     public:
         A(size_t var = 8*1024*1024): b(new char[var]) {
            ...
        }
        ~A() {
            delete [] b;
        }
};

Even then, a smart pointer would be better for b.

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What you've wrote are two different beings : in the first example, var is an input parameter with a default value of 8*1024*1024 while in the second, it is a local const variable. Even if the behaviour is the same, the inner structure isn't.

To anwser your question about the preference of one method over the other, it depends on your design : the former add some flexibility, but also expose a parameter which maybe should stay hidden, while the latter is more rigid, but also less error-prone.

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This is a so called default argument: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/91563f79(v=vs.80).aspx

The difference is that you can set value for the the var in the first case but not in the second case.

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It's really different.

The first represents a default value, that means you can declare A test or A test2(42). In test, b will have a size of 8*1024*1024. In test2, b will have a size of 42.

The second snippet is just a constante value.

You will prefere one to other depending on your needs ...

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