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Consider the following test:

class A
  def print(args)
    puts args
  end
end

describe A do
  let(:a) {A.new}

  it "receives print" do
   a.should_receive(:print).with("World").and_call_original

   a.print("Hello")
   a.print("World")
 end
end

The RSpec Documentation says:

Use should_receive() to set an expectation that a receiver should receive a message before the example is completed.

So I was expecting this test to pass, but it is not. It is failing with the following message:

Failures:

1) A receives print
 Failure/Error: a.print("Hello")
   #<A:0x007feb46283190> received :print with unexpected arguments
     expected: ("World")
          got: ("Hello")

Is this expected behaviour? Is there a way to make this test pass?

I am using ruby 1.9.3p374 and rspec 2.13.1

share|improve this question
    
What documentation you are following? would you share link ? This is I am asking for my self study... :)) –  Arup Rakshit Jun 25 '13 at 14:15
    
There is a link in the question. :) –  tdgs Jun 25 '13 at 14:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This should work:

class A
  def print(args)
    puts args
  end
end

describe A do
  let(:a) {A.new}

  it "receives print" do
   a.stub(:print).with(anything())
   a.should_receive(:print).with("World").and_call_original

   a.print("Hello")
   a.print("World")
 end
end

The test was failing because you had set a precise expectation "a should receive :print with 'World'", but rspec noticed that the a object was receiving the print method with 'Hello' therefore it failed the test. In my solution, I allow the print method to be invoked with any argument, but it still keeps track of the call with "World" as argument.

share|improve this answer
    
In this example, if you omit the a.print("World") line, it will fail? –  Kostas Jun 25 '13 at 15:53
    
@vrinek Yep, it does with Failure/Error: a.should_receive(:print).with("World").and_call_original #<A:0x007feec13ae2a8> received :print with unexpected arguments –  Ju Liu Jun 25 '13 at 15:56
    
I think a.stub(:print).with(anything).and_call_original would be better –  tdgs Jun 26 '13 at 14:00
    
Oh sure, it depends if that method call is a query or a command :) –  Ju Liu Jun 26 '13 at 14:02

How about this?

class A
  def print(args)
    puts args
  end
end

describe A do
  let(:a) {A.new}

  it "receives print" do
   a.should_receive(:print).with("World").and_call_original
   # it's important that this is after the real expectation
   a.should_receive(:print).any_number_of_times

   a.print("Hello")
   a.print("World")
 end
end

It adds a second expectation, which you may want to avoid. However, in consideration of @vrinek's question, this solution has the advantage of providing the correct failure message (expected: 1 time, received: 0 times). Cheers!

share|improve this answer

should_receive checks not only that the expected method was called, but that unexpected methods are not called. Simply add a specification for each invocation you expect:

class A
  def print(args)
    puts args
  end
end

describe A do
  let(:a) {A.new}

  it "receives print" do
   a.should_receive(:print).with("World").and_call_original
   a.should_receive(:print).with("Hello").and_call_original

   a.print("Hello")
   a.print("World")
 end
end
share|improve this answer
1  
The problem is that this is a unit test, and I do not want to pollute it with invocations that have nothing to do with the functionality I wish to test. –  tdgs Jun 29 '13 at 6:37

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