Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

While keeping in mind that:

  • I am using a blocking queue that waits for ever until something is added to it
  • I might get a FileSystemWatcher event twice

The updated code:

 {
        FileProcessingManager processingManager = new FileProcessingManager();
        processingManager.RegisterProcessor(new ExcelFileProcessor());
        processingManager.RegisterProcessor(new PdfFileProcessor());
        processingManager.Completed += new ProcessingCompletedHandler(ProcessingCompletedHandler);
        processingManager.Completed += new ProcessingCompletedHandler(LogFileStatus);
        while (true)
        {
            try
            {
                var jobData = (JobData)fileMonitor.FileQueue.Dequeue();
                if (jobData == null)
                    break;

                _pool.WaitOne();
                Application.Log(String.Format("{0}:{1}", DateTime.Now.ToString(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture), "Thread launched"));
                Task.Factory.StartNew(() => processingManager.Process(jobData));
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                Application.Log(String.Format("{0}:{1}", DateTime.Now.ToString(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture), e.Message));
            }
        }
    }

What are are you suggestions on making the code multi-threaded while taking into consideration the possibility that two identical string paths may be added into the blocking queue? I have left the possibility that this might happen and in this case.. the file would be processed twice, the thing is that sometimes I get it twice, sometimes not, it is really awkward, if you have suggestions on this, please tell.

The null checking is for exiting the loop, I intentionally add a null from outside the threaded loop to determine it to stop.

share|improve this question
    
Can you deduplicate the queue? What kind of paths are you expecting? If you are processing all files in a several directories then you could do a thread per directory kind of thing. – stonemetal Jun 25 '13 at 14:21
    
When you get the alert, can you first move the file to a subfolder? If the move is successful, then add it to the queue. Since a file can only be moved once from A to B, this should prevent duplicates. – mbeckish Jun 25 '13 at 14:28
    
file paths, within a single directory, not more. i don t know if deduplication might help me because when the Second Event would arrive the first notification might as well be popped from the queue so the second notification would be unique at that time in the queue – Alexandru C. Jun 25 '13 at 14:41
    
@mbeckish your idea is interesting, but doesn t this add a lot of overhead, considering for example very large files? – Alexandru C. Jun 25 '13 at 14:42
    
@A.K - You could do some other atomic operation, like adding a record to a database table, create an empty "lock" file, etc. – mbeckish Jun 25 '13 at 14:43
up vote 1 down vote accepted

For multi-threading this... I would probably add a "Completed" event to your FileProcessingManager and register for it. One argument of that event will be the "bool" return value you currently have. Then in that event handler, I would do the checking of the bool and re-queueing of the file. Note that you will have to keep a reference to the FileMonitorManager. So, I would have this ThreadProc method be in a class where you keep the FileMonitorManager and FileProcessingManager instances in a property.

To deduplicate, in ThreadProc, I would create a List outside of the while loop. Then inside the while loop, before you process a file, lock that list, check to see if the string is already in there, if not, add the string to the list and process the file, if it is, then skip processing.

Obviously, this is based on little information surrounding your method but my 2 cents anyway.

Rough code, from Notepad:

private static FileMonitorManager fileMon = null;
private static FileProcessingManager processingManager = new FileProcessingManager();

private static void ThreadProc(object param)
{
    processingManager.RegisterProcessor(new ExcelFileProcessor());
    processingManager.RegisterProcessor(new PdfFileProcessor());
    processingManager.Completed += ProcessingCompletedHandler;
    var procList = new List<string>();

    while (true)
    {
        try
        {
            var path = (string)fileMon.FileQueue.Dequeue();
            if (path == null)
                break;

            bool processThis = false;
            lock(procList)
            {
                if(!procList.Contains(path))
                {
                    processThis = true;
                    procList.Add(path);
                }
            }
            if(processThis)
            {
                Thread t = new Thread (new ParameterizedThreadStart(processingManager.Process));
                t.Start (path);
            }
        }
        catch (System.Exception e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
        }
    }
}

private static void ProcessingCompletedHandler(bool status, string path)
{
    if (!status)
    {
        fileMon.FileQueue.Enqueue(path);
        Console.WriteLine("\n\nError on file: " + path);
    }
    else
        Console.WriteLine("\n\nSucces on file: " + path);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is sounds very interesting, some code example please? – Alexandru C. Jun 25 '13 at 14:48
    
The code is from notepad so it might not compile as is. ;) – Tombala Jun 25 '13 at 15:07
    
Another question, I'm new to events in c#, new to c# actually, just read about them, shouldn't the ProcessingCompletedHandler be called somewhere? sorry if I 'm mistaken. – Alexandru C. Jun 25 '13 at 15:45
1  
Tombala's suggestion points to a direction how the central portion of your code keep track of the currently processed files. I'd look into Task parallel techniques, Task class in general. – Csaba Toth Jun 25 '13 at 16:18
1  
Limiting the thread pool size seems to be a little tricky with TPL. See this – Tombala Jun 26 '13 at 14:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.