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I'm trying to find a query which will return me a list of the foreign keys for a table and the tables and columns they reference. I am half way there with

SELECT a.table_name, 
       a.column_name, 
       a.constraint_name, 
       c.owner
FROM ALL_CONS_COLUMNS A, ALL_CONSTRAINTS C  
where A.CONSTRAINT_NAME = C.CONSTRAINT_NAME 
  and a.table_name=:TableName 
  and C.CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'R'

But I still need to know which table and primary key are referenced by this key. How would I get that?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 49 down vote accepted

the referenced primary key is described in the columns r_owner and r_constraint_name of the table ALL_CONSTRAINTS. This will give you the info you want:

SELECT a.table_name, a.column_name, a.constraint_name, c.owner, 
       -- referenced pk
       c.r_owner, c_pk.table_name r_table_name, c_pk.constraint_name r_pk
  FROM all_cons_columns a
  JOIN all_constraints c ON a.owner = c.owner
                        AND a.constraint_name = c.constraint_name
  JOIN all_constraints c_pk ON c.r_owner = c_pk.owner
                           AND c.r_constraint_name = c_pk.constraint_name
 WHERE c.constraint_type = 'R'
   AND a.table_name = :TableName
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3  
I'm glad that somebody knows about oracle metadata. –  stimms Nov 13 '09 at 15:52
    
Excellent! Thanks! –  gyabraham Nov 22 '13 at 14:33
    
Just a note, the code above does not take into account Composite Foreign Keys. Refer to the answer below by @Dougman on how to account for Composite Key. –  xkrz Mar 26 at 20:33
1  
@xkrz composite foreign keys, as in foreign key defined on multiple columns? I don't see how they would not be taken into account by the above query! –  Vincent Malgrat Mar 27 at 8:04
    
@VincentMalgrat, apologies, my mistake. I was trying to use your code to list the Referred "TableName+ColumnName" instead of constraint name, and it wasn't what your code does. –  xkrz Mar 28 at 21:06

Here is an all-purpose script we use that has been incredibly handy.

Save it off so you can execute it directly (@fkeys.sql). It will let you search by Owner and either the Parent or Child table and show foreign key relationships. The current script does explicitly spool to C:\SQLRPTS so you will need to create that folder of change that line to something you want to use.

REM ########################################################################
REM ##
REM ##   fkeys.sql
REM ##
REM ##   Displays the foreign key relationships
REM ##
REM #######################################################################

CLEAR BREAK
CLEAR COL
SET LINES 200
SET PAGES 54
SET NEWPAGE 0
SET WRAP OFF
SET VERIFY OFF
SET FEEDBACK OFF

break on table_name skip 2 on constraint_name on r_table_name skip 1

column CHILDCOL format a60 head 'CHILD COLUMN'
column PARENTCOL format a60 head 'PARENT COLUMN'
column constraint_name format a30 head 'FK CONSTRAINT NAME'
column delete_rule format a15
column bt noprint
column bo noprint

TTITLE LEFT _DATE CENTER 'FOREIGN KEY RELATIONSHIPS ON &new_prompt' RIGHT 'PAGE:'FORMAT 999 SQL.PNO SKIP 2

SPOOL C:\SQLRPTS\FKeys_&new_prompt
ACCEPT OWNER_NAME PROMPT 'Enter Table Owner (or blank for all): '
ACCEPT PARENT_TABLE_NAME PROMPT 'Enter Parent Table or leave blank for all: '
ACCEPT CHILD_TABLE_NAME PROMPT 'Enter Child Table or leave blank for all: '

  select b.owner || '.' || b.table_name || '.' || b.column_name CHILDCOL,
         b.position,
         c.owner || '.' || c.table_name || '.' || c.column_name PARENTCOL,
         a.constraint_name,
         a.delete_rule,
         b.table_name bt,
         b.owner bo
    from all_cons_columns b,
         all_cons_columns c,
         all_constraints a
   where b.constraint_name = a.constraint_name
     and a.owner           = b.owner
     and b.position        = c.position
     and c.constraint_name = a.r_constraint_name
     and c.owner           = a.r_owner
     and a.constraint_type = 'R'
     and c.owner      like case when upper('&OWNER_NAME') is null then '%'
                                else upper('&OWNER_NAME') end
     and c.table_name like case when upper('&PARENT_TABLE_NAME') is null then '%'
                                else upper('&PARENT_TABLE_NAME') end
     and b.table_name like case when upper('&CHILD_TABLE_NAME') is null then '%'
                                else upper('&CHILD_TABLE_NAME') end
order by 7,6,4,2
/
SPOOL OFF
TTITLE OFF
SET FEEDBACK ON
SET VERIFY ON
CLEAR BREAK
CLEAR COL
SET PAGES 24
SET LINES 100
SET NEWPAGE 1
UNDEF OWNER
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Here is an another solution. Using sys's default views are so slow (approx 10s in my situation). This is much faster than that (approx. 0.5s).

SELECT
    CONST.NAME AS CONSTRAINT_NAME,
    RCONST.NAME AS REF_CONSTRAINT_NAME,

    OBJ.NAME AS TABLE_NAME,
    COALESCE(ACOL.NAME, COL.NAME) AS COLUMN_NAME,
    CCOL.POS# AS POSITION,

    ROBJ.NAME AS REF_TABLE_NAME,
    COALESCE(RACOL.NAME, RCOL.NAME) AS REF_COLUMN_NAME,
    RCCOL.POS# AS REF_POSITION
FROM SYS.CON$ CONST
INNER JOIN SYS.CDEF$ CDEF ON CDEF.CON# = CONST.CON#
INNER JOIN SYS.CCOL$ CCOL ON CCOL.CON# = CONST.CON#
INNER JOIN SYS.COL$ COL  ON (CCOL.OBJ# = COL.OBJ#) AND (CCOL.INTCOL# = COL.INTCOL#)
INNER JOIN SYS.OBJ$ OBJ ON CCOL.OBJ# = OBJ.OBJ#
LEFT JOIN SYS.ATTRCOL$ ACOL ON (CCOL.OBJ# = ACOL.OBJ#) AND (CCOL.INTCOL# = ACOL.INTCOL#)

INNER JOIN SYS.CON$ RCONST ON RCONST.CON# = CDEF.RCON#
INNER JOIN SYS.CCOL$ RCCOL ON RCCOL.CON# = RCONST.CON#
INNER JOIN SYS.COL$ RCOL  ON (RCCOL.OBJ# = RCOL.OBJ#) AND (RCCOL.INTCOL# = RCOL.INTCOL#)
INNER JOIN SYS.OBJ$ ROBJ ON RCCOL.OBJ# = ROBJ.OBJ#
LEFT JOIN SYS.ATTRCOL$ RACOL  ON (RCCOL.OBJ# = RACOL.OBJ#) AND (RCCOL.INTCOL# = RACOL.INTCOL#)

WHERE CONST.OWNER# = userenv('SCHEMAID')
  AND RCONST.OWNER# = userenv('SCHEMAID')
  AND CDEF.TYPE# = 4  /* 'R' Referential/Foreign Key */;
share|improve this answer
    
This isn't working for me in Oracle 10g. "_CURRENT_EDITION_OBJ" is unrecognized. –  StilesCrisis Sep 17 '13 at 17:48
1  
Hi, replace SYS."_CURRENT_EDITION_OBJ" with SYS.OBJ$. It would run on both 10g and 11g. And make sure you enough privileges. Also I changed my answer with SYS.OBJ$. –  Ganbat Bayarbaatar Sep 18 '13 at 3:29

This will travel the hierarchy of foreign keys for a given table and column and return columns from child and grandchild, and all descendant tables. It uses sub-queries to add r_table_name and r_column_name to user_constraints, and then uses them to connect rows.

select distinct table_name, constraint_name, column_name, r_table_name, position, constraint_type 
from (
    SELECT uc.table_name, 
    uc.constraint_name, 
    cols.column_name, 
    (select table_name from user_constraints where constraint_name = uc.r_constraint_name) 
        r_table_name,
    (select column_name from user_cons_columns where constraint_name = uc.r_constraint_name and position = cols.position) 
        r_column_name,
    cols.position,
    uc.constraint_type
    FROM user_constraints uc
    inner join user_cons_columns cols on uc.constraint_name = cols.constraint_name 
    where constraint_type != 'C'
) 
start with table_name = 'MY_TABLE_NAME' and column_name = 'MY_COLUMN_NAME'  
connect by nocycle 
prior table_name = r_table_name 
and prior column_name = r_column_name;
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If you need all the foreign keys of the user then use the following script

SELECT a.constraint_name, a.table_name, a.column_name,  c.owner, 
       c_pk.table_name r_table_name,  b.column_name r_column_name
  FROM user_cons_columns a
  JOIN user_constraints c ON a.owner = c.owner
       AND a.constraint_name = c.constraint_name
  JOIN user_constraints c_pk ON c.r_owner = c_pk.owner
       AND c.r_constraint_name = c_pk.constraint_name
  JOIN user_cons_columns b ON C_PK.owner = b.owner
       AND  C_PK.CONSTRAINT_NAME = b.constraint_name AND b.POSITION = a.POSITION     
 WHERE c.constraint_type = 'R'

based on Vincent Malgrat code

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