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I am thinking about a problem I haven't encountered before and I'm trying to determine the most efficient algorithm to use.

I am iterating over two lists, using each pair of elements to calculate a value that I wish to sort on. My end goal is to obtain the top twenty results. I could store the results in a third list, sort that list by absolute value, and simply slice the top twenty, but that is not ideal.

Since these lists have the potential to become extremely large, I'd ideally like to only store the top twenty absolute values, evicting old values as a new top value is calculated.

What would be the most efficient way to implement this in python?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Take a look at heapq.nlargest:

heapq.nlargest(n, iterable[, key])

Return a list with the n largest elements from the dataset defined by iterable. key, if provided, specifies a function of one argument that is used to extract a comparison key from each element in the iterable: key=str.lower Equivalent to: sorted(iterable, key=key, reverse=True)[:n]

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2  
@ElmoVanKielmo Odds are that you're wrong. The standard algorithm is that you try to grab n things, put them in a heap with the root being the smallest, then you start a cycle of add one, remove the smallest, add another, remove the smallest, etc. When you are done N elements you have the top n with memory requirements O(n) and performance O(N log(n)). –  btilly Jun 25 '13 at 19:50
    
Thank you @btilly for claryfing the implementation details. Upvoted your comment as well as arshajii's answer. This is really great and pythonic solution. Take a look at my answer stackoverflow.com/questions/17300419/python-sort-on-the-fly/… It is somewhat similar: first put 20 results and then cycle. However: I keep ordering of results by myself, I check if adding new result makes sense by comparing to lowest value already present in results, and as you can see: I'm using list (max length 20) to store results, and generator expression to fetch new candidates. –  ElmoVanKielmo Jun 25 '13 at 20:15
1  
Just as a note, if n is some large fraction of len(iterable), it's faster to just sort the list. –  Nick T Jun 25 '13 at 20:43
1  
Good note @NickT, so +1. However it is clearly said that in this case input lists are huge and we only want 20 results in the end. –  ElmoVanKielmo Jun 25 '13 at 20:48
    
@NickT The constant depends on the data, datatypes, programming language, etc. In Python with random strings you would need it to be a large fraction. If there are mostly sorted chunks, Python's timsort will become much faster. In C++ with integers and a large list, heap sort's poor use of CPU caches would really hurt it. –  btilly Jun 26 '13 at 1:07

You can use izip to iterate the two lists in parallel, and build a generator to lazily do a calculation over them, then heapq.nlargest to effectively keep the top n:

from itertools import izip
import heapq

list_a = [1, 2, 3]
list_b = [3, 4, 7]

vals = (abs(a - b) for a, b in izip(list_a, list_b))
print heapq.nlargest(2, vals)
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+1 for using izip, generator expression and heapq. Python programmers love one-liners and batteries included, don't they? ;) –  ElmoVanKielmo Jun 25 '13 at 20:45

Have a list of size 20 tupples initialised with less than the minimum result of the calculation and two indices of -1. On calculating a result append it to the results list, with the indices of the pair that resulted, sort on the value only and trim the list to length 20. Should be reasonably efficient as you only ever sort a list of length 21.

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How could we know the minimum result of calculation? And we don't need dummy 20 tuples. The list could be empty in the begining. See my answer stackoverflow.com/questions/17300419/python-sort-on-the-fly/… –  ElmoVanKielmo Jun 25 '13 at 20:42

I know that the best answer is already chosen but for educational purposes you can consider mine as well.

I hope there is no typo:

def some_name(list_a, list_b):
    if len(list_a) != len(list_b):
        raise Exception("Too bad")
    result_list = []
    for result in (list_a[i] + list_b[i] for i in range(len(list_a))):
        if len(result_list) >= 20:
            if result_list[0] > result:
                continue
            result_list = result_list[1:]
        result_list.append(result)
        result_list.sort()

And a after some refactoring - it does almost what heapq.nlargest would do (ofcourse here we have to keep results sorted on our own):

def some_name(list_a, list_b):
    if len(list_a) != len(list_b):
        raise Exception("Too bad")
    result_list = []
    for result in (list_a[i] + list_b[i] for i in range(len(list_a))):
        result_list.append(result)
        result_list.sort()
        result_list = result_list[-20:]
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