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I have some problems with the following code, it seems the loadTheme variable never is null even though nothing is found in the userDefaults:

NSString *loadTheme = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@",[[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] valueForKey:@"theme"]];

if (!loadTheme){
    NSLog(@"No theme set");
    loadTheme =  @"Default";
}

How do I properly make sure that the if clause gets run if nothing is in the storage (userdefaults)

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check with @"" or [NSNull null] –  Anoop Vaidya Jun 25 '13 at 15:34
    
Also NSString *loadTheme = [[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] valueForKey:@"theme"]; is enough, no need to use stringWithFormat –  Anoop Vaidya Jun 25 '13 at 15:38
    
it seems the the string with format made a string containing the word (nil), at least it gets the length 6 and NSLog prints (nil) –  David Karlsson Jun 25 '13 at 15:42
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Per the documentation, it returns nil if the key does not exist. You should structure the process as:

NSString *theme = [[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] stringForKey:@"theme"];
if (theme == nil) {
   /* No theme, probably throw an error, return, and/or use a default value */
}
/* Theme is there, do whatever with "theme" */
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You could do like this.

NSString *loadTheme = [NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] stringForKey:@"theme"];
if (loadTheme.length == 0) {
    NSLog(@"No theme set");
    loadTheme =  @"Default";
}

When you generate an NSString by stringWithFormat: method, it can never be a nil. By using the length of a string, you can tell all @"" and nil(if you have not set the value yet) from other strings. Be careful to make sure you saved an NSString to the user default key. If you can not get an NSString or nil, you might get a unrecognized selector error.

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it seems the the string with format made a string containing the word ('nil') –  David Karlsson Jun 25 '13 at 15:40
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I found this as a part of NSUserDefaults on iPhone SDK not returning nil

Test from a new iPhone project:

if (![[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] valueForKey:@"foobar"])         NSLog(@"is not yet defined");
if (![[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] objectForKey:@"foobar"])        NSLog(@"is not yet defined");
if ([[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] valueForKey:@"foobar"] == nil)   NSLog(@"valueForKey is nil");
if ([[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] objectForKey:@"foobar"] == nil)  NSLog(@"objectForKey is nil");

It outputs:

is not yet defined
is not yet defined
valueForKey is nil
objectForKey is nil

So from above you must have got the solution.

Also,

NSString *loadTheme = [[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] valueForKey:@"theme"]; 

is enough, no need to use stringWithFormat:

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