Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why does JavaScript allow you to multiply arrays with a single numeric value by another numeric value or by another array with a single numeric value?:

[3] * 3;
// 9

[3] * 2;
// 6

[3] * [3];
// 9

[1, 2] * 2
// NaN

I would expect NaN to be returned every time but as my experiments in Chrome have demonstrated this is not the case.

Is this the expected behavior? Does this behavior make sense? If so, why?

share|improve this question
2  
I think that youtube.com/watch?v=kXEgk1Hdze0 is the only possible answer here :) –  Ju Liu Jun 25 '13 at 15:58

3 Answers 3

[3] * 3;

The following steps are taken:

  • array is converted to a string [3] => "3"
  • the string is converted to a number Number("3") => 3
  • 3 * 3 gives 9

Similarly, for [1, 2] * 2:

  • array is converted to a string [1, 2] => ""1,2"
  • the string is converted to a number Number("1,2") => NaN
  • NaN * 3 gives NaN

For ECMA freaks among us ;) start here and follow the path multiplicative operator => ToNumber => ToPrimitive => [[DefaultValue]](number) => valueOf => toString

share|improve this answer
    
Makes perfect sense now. ... In the context of my _.clone method where I noticed this behavior, it seems undesired (perhaps not, I'm undecided): _.clone([1, 2, [3]], function(num) { return num * 2; }) where a callback is applied to each value and so the returned result is [2, 4, 6]. ... I don't want to fight against the language I'm using but in this case the result of this behavior seems like trouble. What do you think? –  Xaxis Jun 25 '13 at 16:01
    
@Xaxis: I don't understand what clone means here. Is it map? In any case, JS is weakly-typed, if you want to enforce strict typing, add explicit type checking: if(typeof x == number)... else throw(...) –  georg Jun 25 '13 at 16:06
    
My clone method makes a deep copy of an array or object with the option of calling a callback on each value. ... Yes, I'm well aware I can perform type checking but that would limit the methods callback to only working on values that are numbers. ... Anyway, I appreciate the feedback greatly! –  Xaxis Jun 25 '13 at 16:11
    
@Xaxis: if this is the case, I'd expect the result of clone([1,2,[3]]) to be [2,4,[6]], with the callback being called on each primitive value. –  georg Jun 25 '13 at 16:44

What is happening here is that [3] is being coerced into a String type, which is just "3". Then in "3" * 3 the String value "3" gets converted into the number 3. You finally end up with 3 * 3, which evaluates to 9.

You can see this behavior if you do [3].toString() * 3 or "3" * 3, which also gives you 9,

So the following steps happen:

  • [3] * 3
  • [3].toString() * 3
  • "3" * 3
  • Number("3") * 3
  • 3 * 3
  • 9

In the case [1, 2], you eventually end up with "1, 2". But Number("1, 2") results in a NaN and a number multiplied with a NaN results in NaN.

share|improve this answer

http://ecma-international.org/ecma-262/5.1/#sec-15.4.4.2

Since Array.prototype.valueOf is not available, it falls back to using the String version (as per http://ecma-international.org/ecma-262/5.1/#sec-9.9)

The toString renders an array with a single element as the value of the element (so [3].toString() is 3)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.