Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to use a template class which is defined in another template class as parameter of another template as return value in template method. I know it sounds complicated, code below explains it better. Problem is that the code cannot be compiled, it ends with following error:

type/value mismatch at argument 2 in template parameter list for 'template<class T, template<class> class Policy> class Result'
expected a class template, got 'CDummy<T2>::Policy2'

but I'm pretty sure that given class fulfills needs. Problem is that the method, which uses it, is template too and so compiler does not know what exactly CDummy<T2>::Policy2 is. If the Policy2 would not be template, but regular class or if I could fill its argument, I would use typename which would tell the compiler not to worry about it, but how can this be done with template?

// I cannot change this interface - it's given by a library
template <class T, template <class> class Policy>
class Result : public Policy<T>
{
    T data;
};

template <class T>
class Policy1
{

};

// I use this for allowing Policy2 to change behaviour according Dummy
// while it keeps template interface for class above
template <class Dummy>
class CDummy
{
public:
    template <class T>
    class Policy2 : public Policy1<T>
    {

    };
};

// Both variables are created ok
Result<int, Policy1 > var1;
Result<int, CDummy<float>::Policy2 > var2;

// This is ok, too
template <class T>
Result<T, Policy1 > calc1()
{
    return Result<int, Policy1>();
}

// But this ends with the error:
// type/value mismatch at argument 2 in template parameter list for 'template<class T, template<class> class Policy> class Result'
// expected a class template, got 'CDummy<T2>::Policy2'
template <class T1, class T2>
Result<T1, CDummy<T2>::Policy2 > calc2() // <-- Here is the generated error
{
    typedef typename DummyTypedef CDummy<T2>;
    return Result<T1, DummyTypedef::Policy2>();
}

Notes:

  • I use gcc 4.7.3 32bit in GNU/Linux Ubuntu 13.04. 32 bit.
  • For various reasons, I cannot use C++11 standard (yet) and so I cannot use template typedefs
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I believe that the name CDummy<T2>::Policy2 is a dependent name in that context and that you should use the template keyword to inform the compiler that it is indeed a template.

template <class T1, class T2>
Result<T1, CDummy<T2>::template Policy2 > calc2() // <-- Here is the generated error
//                     ^^^^^^^^

additionally the implementation of that same function seems to be wrong also. The order of typedefs is original name, new name, and CDummy<T2> is known to be a type (i.e. there is no need for the typename):

typedef CDummy<T2> DummyTypedef;

The return statement would then be:

return Result<T1, DummyTypedef::template Policy2>();
share|improve this answer
    
"use the template keyword to inform the compiler that it is indeed a template and not a type.", I believe that in CDummy<T2>::Policy2 the compiler will assume that "Policy2" is either a static data member or a member function (pointer), not a type. –  Mikael Persson Jun 25 '13 at 17:00
    
@MikaelPersson: That is an interesting question. In general that is the case (i.e. by default dependent names are considered to be non-type (non-template)), but I don't think that is true for all contexts, and in particular in a context where a type is required. I am not even sure this is one of those situations, so you are probably right. Updated the answer. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 25 '13 at 17:10
    
Ok, thank you very much, this worked - problem solved. (I thought of this and tried before asking, but apparently I did it wrong.) About second part of your answer (implementation of the calc2() method): yeah, thank you, too. Because of previous error, I didn't pay attention to it much. –  Laethnes Jun 25 '13 at 17:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.