Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have developed a way to store a large number of unique elements in an excel sheet (indexed by date and another numeric identifier) that makes retreiveing entries extremely fast. I convert the date and numeric identifier into a combined unique integer, and use that as the row number in which I store data. This meets all of my needs, because I can quickly retreive the data by its row number (rather than a .find or iteration) and did not have to implement any additional code for overwrites (simply change the value in the appropriate row, without having to check for any existing entries matching that row number and numeric identifier).

However, this results in an extremely sparse sheet. I'm concerned about the file size and memory requirements of this method. How does Excel store data? Does it write empty cells to disk when the file is saved? Does it load them into memory when the workbook is open? If no, how does it store data?

share|improve this question
    
It seems fairly easy to test. A quick example with the first few rows populated or the same number of rows on very distant lines shows no noticeable size difference on Excel 2010. –  assylias Jun 25 '13 at 16:43
    
I see. I just did the same test, and got similar results. I also looked at memory usage, and see it doesn't affect that considerably either. –  IanPudney Jun 25 '13 at 16:56
1  
Pre-2007 file formats will probably have a significant size difference. But with the newer storage formats that save as .xml inside the zip container, such data anomalies do not have much impact. –  Alan Waage Jun 25 '13 at 17:18
1  
You can examine the innards of an Excel file (as long as it is 2007 or later) by changing the file's extension from .xlsm or .xlsx to .zip. You can then see that Excel stores the data using xml format. I would guess the sparseness of data does not change the file size much. –  Cody Piersall Jun 25 '13 at 17:36
    
Thanks for the information. Also, those responses definitely qualify as answers, Alan and Cody; you should post them as such, so you can receive your due repuation. –  IanPudney Jun 25 '13 at 17:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Pre-2007 file formats will probably have a significant size difference. But with the newer storage formats that save as .xml inside the zip container, such data anomalies do not have much impact.

Twist my arm =)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.