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So I'm pretty new to C, but not to programming. I am trying to learn C and so I decided to try implementing a simple linked list.

Here is the code:

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct node node;
struct node {
    char *word;
    node *next;
};

// Returns a node.
node node_new(char *word) {
    node n;
    n.word = word;
    n.next = NULL;
    return n;
}

// Traverses the linked list, spitting out the
// words onto the console.
void traverse(node *head) {
    node *cur = head;

    while (cur != NULL) {
        printf("I have %s.\n", cur->word);
        cur = cur->next;
    }

    printf("Done.\n");

    return;
}

// In here I get circular references whenever I pass a second argument.
void dynamic(int argc, char **argv) {
    printf("DYNAMIC:\n");

    node n = node_new("ROOT");
    node *cur = &n;

    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < argc; i++) {
        node next = node_new(argv[i]);
        cur->next = &next;
        cur = &next;
    }

    traverse(&n);
}

void predefined(void) {
    printf("PREDEFINED:\n");

    node n = node_new("ROOT");
    node a = node_new("A");
    node b = node_new("B");
    node c = node_new("C");

    n.next = &a;
    a.next = &b;
    b.next = &c;

    traverse(&n);
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    predefined();
    dynamic(argc, argv);
    return 0;
}

If I just run it without arguments ("./test") the output is:

PREDEFINED:
I have ROOT.
I have A.
I have B.
I have C.
Done.
DYNAMIC:
I have ROOT.
I have ./test.
Done.

but if I put any arguments on, instead of "I have ./test." it gives an infinite loop of whatever the last argument on the command line was ("./test one two three" gives "i have three." over and over ignores the "one" and "two", but the preceding lines are the same).

I think it has to do with bad pointer management in the dynamic function, but I can't figure out why it's setting itself to its own "next" node.

share|improve this question
    
i think you have a stack allocation vs heap problem? –  im so confused Jun 25 '13 at 17:27
    
when you allocate on the stack, and make the copy node n = new_node(), it releases n at the end of the scope (your for loop) –  im so confused Jun 25 '13 at 17:28
    
It does release n, which is exactly what I want. The first time through the for loop, it sets the "head"'s next node to point to n. I can't think what I'm doing wrong. And I can't see why I'd need malloc since I'm not doing any dynamic memory management. I'm only moving pointers. But I have never used C before two days ago so I really don't know. –  scott_fakename Jun 25 '13 at 17:35
1  
you've exactly hit the point but in the wrong way - you aren't using dynamic mm. That means whatever you did to n, created, edited, etc is undone at the } at the end of the for loop. its scope is local and a new "n" is created in the exact same spot in the next loop iteration –  im so confused Jun 25 '13 at 17:39
    
read @wallyk's answer which explains it clearly –  im so confused Jun 25 '13 at 17:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is here:

for (i = 0; i < argc; i++) {
    node next = node_new(argv[i]);
    cur->next = &next;
    cur = &next;
}

By allocating next like this, it remains tied to the stack and doesn't actually change address on each iteration. It should be a new object each time:

for (i = 0; i < argc; i++) {
    node *next = malloc (sizeof node);
    next->word = argv[i];
    next->next = NULL;
    cur->next = next;
    cur = next;
}

Also, node_new() can't be used because it doesn't allocate any lasting new memory either.

share|improve this answer

The problem is in your for loop. Every iteration uses the same memory location on the stack to store the next variable. So, effectively, the memory location given by &next is a constant for your entire for loop, and by the time you run traverse, that memory location contains last value of next.

Your for loop is equivalent to this version, which might shed more light:

int i;
node next;  // note this line
for (i = 0; i < argc; i++) {
    next = node_new(argv[i]);
    cur->next = &next;
    cur = &next;
}

You'll need to create new nodes on the heap, if you want to be able to pass their addresses around, or store their addresses in other data structures. Read up on malloc and free.

share|improve this answer

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