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I have a database which I manage with phpMyAdmin. I have a table to save the verb tense and the verb. It looks like it follows:

Column | Type        | Collation         |  Attributes | Null | Default | Extra
-------+-------------+-------------------+-------------+------+---------+------
form   | varchar(50) | latin1_swedish_ci |             | No   |         |
verb   | varchar(50) | latin1_swedish_ci |             | Yes  | NULL    |

and I created and index to have a faster access:

Keyname     | Type  | Unique | Packed | Column | Cardinality | Collation | Null | Comment
------------+-------+--------+--------+--------+-------------+-----------+------+--------
verbs_index | BTREE | Yes    | No     | form   | 1           | A         |      |
            |       |        |        | verb   | 1           | A         | YES  |

The goal of this is to have an association between a verb and all its verbs tenses (form) but the problem comes when I try to insert a pair (form,verb) with an accent if the form without accent already exists. Those are the same words to MySql and I get the error:

Duplicate entry 'form-verb' for key 'verbs_index'.

I'd like to insert:

insert into verbs values('o','verb1'); (without accent)
insert into verbs values('ó','verb1'); (with accent)

I've been looking at collation stuff and I've already tried with every latin and utf8.

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Would this post help ? Don't be sad, you're not alone with that problem, which is not a bug (although I find it strange default behavior but still...) –  Bartdude Jun 25 '13 at 17:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The "case insensitive" collation will compare strings ignoring any kind of variation. The case of course. But it will also ignore diacritical marks. So for example, o, O, Ô and ò are considered equal.

To know the available collations on your system, use SHOW COLLATION:

mysql> SHOW COLLATION;
+----------------------+----------+-----+---------+----------+---------+
| Collation            | Charset  | Id  | Default | Compiled | Sortlen |
+----------------------+----------+-----+---------+----------+---------+
[...]
| latin1_german1_ci    | latin1   |   5 |         | Yes      |       1 |
| latin1_swedish_ci    | latin1   |   8 | Yes     | Yes      |       1 |
| latin1_danish_ci     | latin1   |  15 |         | Yes      |       1 |
| latin1_german2_ci    | latin1   |  31 |         | Yes      |       2 |
| latin1_bin           | latin1   |  47 |         | Yes      |       1 |
| latin1_general_ci    | latin1   |  48 |         | Yes      |       1 |
| latin1_general_cs    | latin1   |  49 |         | Yes      |       1 |
| latin1_spanish_ci    | latin1   |  94 |         | Yes      |       1 |
| latin2_czech_cs      | latin2   |   2 |         | Yes      |       4 |
| latin2_general_ci    | latin2   |   9 | Yes     | Yes      |       1 |
| latin2_hungarian_ci  | latin2   |  21 |         | Yes      |       1 |
| latin2_croatian_ci   | latin2   |  27 |         | Yes      |       1 |
[...]

Say you which to change your table collation to latin1_general_cs (_cs for case-sensitive -- well case + accents and so on):

mysql> ALTER TABLE verbs COLLATE latin1_general_cs;
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Thanks!! Very helpful! :) –  aartor Jun 26 '13 at 18:06

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