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I have an array total of 12 elements, each element represents and int. For instance total[0] = 1. I have another array remaining that is total - occupied spaces. remaining will have fewer elements that total.

I want to write a method that can look in total for instances where there are >= size gaps between consecutive ints in the array. For example:

If `foo.total = [1,2,6,7,8,9,]`
then when I call `foo.number_of_slots_available(3)`
I get `2` (because 3,4,5 is not included and 10,11,12 is not included)

Here are the beginnings of my method:

def number_of_slots(size)
  total_array = (1..12).to_a
  occupied_spaces = some_map.to_a
  remaining_array = total_array - occupied_spaces
  return ????
end 
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need more in formations.. input numbers and what is your expected output ? –  Arup Rakshit Jun 25 '13 at 17:49
    
is 'total' always sorted? –  Christian Vielma Jun 25 '13 at 18:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Enumerable#chunk is the good way to go. Look below.

arr = [1,2,6,7,8,9]
rng = (1..12).to_a

rng.chunk { |i| arr.include? i }.to_a
# => [[true, [1, 2]],
#     [false, [3, 4, 5]],
#     [true, [6, 7, 8, 9]],
#     [false, [10, 11, 12]]]

rng.chunk { |i| arr.include? i }.count{|j| j[0] == false} 
# => 2 

Edit

"I want to write a method that can look in total for instances where there are >= size gaps between consecutive ints in the array"

arr = [1,2,3,6,7,8,9,10,11]
rng = (1..15).to_a

rng.chunk { |i| arr.include? i }.to_a
# => [[true, [1, 2, 3]],
#     [false, [4, 5]],
#     [true, [6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11]],
#     [false, [12, 13, 14, 15]]]

rng.chunk { |i| arr.include? i }.count{|j| j[0] == false and j[1].size >= 3 } 
# => 1
rng.chunk { |i| arr.include? i }.count{|j| j[0] == false and j[1].size >= 2 } 
# => 2 
# J[1] is the array,whose size is the actual gap size.
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1  
this works generally. How do I write somehting like j[0] == false and j[0].size >= n? –  Joe Essey Jun 25 '13 at 18:19
    
@JoeEssey I concentrated on your input and expected output - If foo.total = [1,2,6,7,8,9,] then when I call foo.number_of_slots_available(3) I get 2 (because 3,4,5 is not included and 10,11,12 is not included) –  Arup Rakshit Jun 25 '13 at 18:32
    
I got it. use j.size and ensure the size you're checking against is 1 less than what you want since ruby uses index size here. –  Joe Essey Jun 25 '13 at 18:33
    
@Sergio Tulentsev Thanks for your edit... :)) –  Arup Rakshit Jun 25 '13 at 18:33
    
@JoeEssey Did you understand how #chunk work? I probably not understood what you mean to say by j.size. –  Arup Rakshit Jun 25 '13 at 18:35

If total is sorted is a simple algorithm and should be something like this (I might have some syntax errors):

def containsGaps(total, gap)
   int i = 0;
   int count = 0;
   while i < total.length -1 do
     if total[i+1] - total[i] >= gap then count++;
   end 
   return count;
end

And your return might be:

return containsGaps(total_array, size);
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Here is a way I found of doing it. I modified the method a bit adding in the array to be passed along with the size.

#!/usr/bin/ruby

arr = [1,2,6,7,8,9]
bar = [1,2,3,6,7,10]

def number_of_slots(arr, size)
  count = 0
  range = (1..12).to_a
  # arr.sort! (if the array is not always sorted)
  range.each_cons(size) do |chunk|
    if (chunk & arr).size == 0
      count += 1
    end
  end
  count
end

puts number_of_slots(arr, 3)
puts number_of_slots(bar, 2)

Output:

2
3
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