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With the lists below, how can I get the distinct lists from the lists below without doing a full brute-force comparison? In the example, list2 and list3 are identical, so I would only want list1 and list2.

var list1 = new List<int>{1,2,3,4,5};
var list2 = new List<int>{2,3};
var list3 = new List<int>{3,2};
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Replace the lists with a collection of HashSets.

You can then write

hashSets.Distinct(HashSet<int>.CreateSetComparer())
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2  
Doesn't this assume he's fine with not allowing duplicate entries? For the operation its alright to not have duplicates, but whats to say that duplicate entries aren't valid in some other usage? –  FlyingStreudel Jun 25 '13 at 18:48
    
@FlyingStreudel: Correct. If he's ignoring order, it's usually safe to assume that he doesn't want duplicates. –  SLaks Jun 25 '13 at 21:27

EDIT Use List<>.Sort + IEnumerable's .Any and .SequenceEqual

public static List<List<int>> Test1(List<int>[] lists)
{
    var result = new List<List<int>>();
    foreach(var list in lists)
    {
        list.Sort();
        if(!result.Any(elm => elm.SequenceEqual(list)))
            result.Add(list);
    }
    return result;
}

Here's a simple benchmark/test showing the HashSet method and the pre-.Sort .Any .SequenceEqual method. edit http://ideone.com/x3CJ8I of course ideone probably isn't the best benchmarking platform so feel free to run it on your own machine.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Diagnostics;

public class Demo
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        int tries = 100;
        int count = 50;
        int size = 1000;
        Random rnd = new Random();
        List<int>[] list;
        Stopwatch sw;

        sw = new Stopwatch();
        for(int x=0; x<tries; x++)
        {
            list = new List<int>[count];
            for(int y=0; y<count; y++)
            {
                list[y] = new List<int>();
                for(int z=0; z<size; z++)
                {
                    int n = rnd.Next();
                    list[y].Add(n);
                }
                if((y % 5) == 0 && y > 0)
                { // make repeated lists for the uniqueness check
                    list[y-1] = new List<int>(list[y]);
                    list[y-1].Reverse();
                }
            }
            sw.Start();
            Test1(list);
            sw.Stop();
        }
        Console.WriteLine( sw.Elapsed.ToString() );

        sw = new Stopwatch();
        for(int x=0; x<tries; x++)
        {
            list = new List<int>[count];
            for(int y=0; y<count; y++)
            {
                list[y] = new List<int>();
                for(int z=0; z<size; z++)
                {
                    int n = rnd.Next();
                    list[y].Add(n);
                }
                if((y % 5) == 0 && y > 0)
                { // make repeated lists for the uniqueness check
                    list[y-1] = new List<int>(list[y]);
                    list[y-1].Reverse();
                }
            }
            sw.Start();
            Test2(list);
            sw.Stop();
        }
        Console.WriteLine( sw.Elapsed.ToString() );
    }
    public static List<List<int>> Test1(List<int>[] lists)
    {
        var result = new List<List<int>>();
        foreach(var list in lists)
        {
            list.Sort();
            if(!result.Any(elm => elm.SequenceEqual(list)))
                result.Add(list);
        }
        return result;
    }
    public static List<HashSet<int>> Test2(List<int>[] lists)
    {
        var result = new List<HashSet<int>>();
        foreach(var list in lists)
        {
            result.Add(new HashSet<int>(list));
        }
        result = result.Distinct(HashSet<int>.CreateSetComparer()).ToList();
        return result;
    }
}

EDIT I had time to modify the test, turns out the overhead of creating HashSets + .Distinct is edit EVERY SIMILAR to that of .Sort + .Any + .SequenceEqual. http://ideone.com/x3CJ8I

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Note that this is noticeably less performant than a hash-based solution. –  Servy Jun 25 '13 at 19:18
    
@Servy - I don't know how noticeable the performance would be. Perhaps you can benchmark it. Also, just because a solution may have less lines of code doesn't always guarantee it will be faster. –  Louis Ricci Jun 25 '13 at 19:29
    
What's your basis for assuming that I was using lines of code as a benchmark? I was not. Sorting is not a particularly cheap operation, at least in comparison to what's going on in a hash-based solution in terms of the asymptotic complexity of the algorithm being used. Your first solution is particularly bad, as you end up sorting each of the lists quite a few different times. –  Servy Jun 25 '13 at 19:32
    
@Servy - Here's a simple test ideone.com/gDBrrS doesn't seem to show much of an advantage at all. Sorting small lists integer lists doesn't seem to bother .NET. Perhaps you can modify the simple test to demonstrate your point? –  Louis Ricci Jun 25 '13 at 19:57
    
Sure sorting a list of size 2 is going to be fast...you'd need to have a non-trivially sized data set to do a meaningful performance test. Now if you sort several dozen lists with a few hundred items each (which is actually a rather small amount of data) you can start to get an idea of what the performance differences might be. If you want to look at a larger amount of data you could go with lists with several thousand or tens of thousands of lines, which a more modest amount of data. –  Servy Jun 25 '13 at 20:05

You could also concat the three lists and then do a .Distinct()

list<int> newList = list1.Concat(list2.Concat(list3)).Distinct();
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actually you could union and except too. –  Jeevan Jose Jun 25 '13 at 19:21
    
Apparently the OP wants a list of lists "List<List<int>>" as a result. The question is a bit difficult to read. –  Louis Ricci Jun 25 '13 at 19:31

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