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Here's my code, it's supposed to do something very similar to what this other question is trying to do, in particular this diagram is relavent: Process Diagram with f1 = produce, f2 = f3 = worker, f4 = consumer.

I haven't yet tried to takle the problem of ending everything nicely, that's not what this question is about. I'm getting the error "RuntimeError: Queue objects should only be shared between processes through inheritance" And I'm not sure what to do to fix it. I just want to pass the queues into functions like Go's channels, really. Here is the code.

import multiprocessing


def produce(n, queue):
    for i in xrange(n):
        queue.put(i)

def worker(in_queue, out_queue):
    for i in iter( in_queue.get, None):
        out_queue.put(i*i)

def consumer(queue):
    ans = []
    for i in iter( queue.get, None):
        ans.append(i)
    return ans


def main(n):
    pool = multiprocessing.Pool(4)
    in_queue = multiprocessing.Queue()
    out_queue = multiprocessing.Queue()

    pool.apply_async(produce, (n, in_queue))
    for i in range(2):
        pool.apply_async(worker, (in_queue, out_queue))
    result = consumer(out_queue)
    pool.close()
    pool.join()
    return result

main(200)

How would I go about fixing it?

Is there an easier way to do it?

I have tried Pool.map, but I'd like to get this working.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A multiprocessing.Pool already sets up the necessary IPC mechanisms to allow you to submit jobs to its workers after it has been started, but you can't pass ist a Queue or similar later as an argument. That's why your code doesn't work. At the time a subprocess is started, it aleady has to know how to communicate with its parent.

So if you need to set up your own Queues, you should use multiprocessing.Process directly. Also, what you're writing are typical workers, which wait in a loop for new jobs and process them. Running such a worker on a pool of workers is not something you want to do.

This way your code would work:

import multiprocessing


def produce(n, queue):
    for i in xrange(n):
        queue.put(i)

def worker(in_queue, out_queue):
    for i in iter( in_queue.get, None):
        out_queue.put(i*i)

def consumer(queue):
    ans = []
    for i in iter( queue.get, None):
        print(i)
        ans.append(i)
    return ans


def main(n):
    in_queue = multiprocessing.Queue()
    out_queue = multiprocessing.Queue()
    producer = multiprocessing.Process(target=produce, args=(n, in_queue))
    for i in range(2):
        w = multiprocessing.Process(target=worker, args=(in_queue, out_queue))
        w.start()
    producer.start()
    res = consumer(out_queue)

main(200)

I've added a print statement in your consumer to show that there is something happening. The consumer function just never terminates, because the code where you reading from the queues waits for a terminating None which never comes because neither workers nor producer ever put one into the queues...

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, so it was mixing pools and queues that caused the error, thanks. –  Theo Belaire Jun 25 '13 at 21:16

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