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I the code {} is perfectly legal in JavaScript as it represents a Block.

However, I notices that nesting a lot of blocks ({{...}}) inside another raises in Chrome*:

Uncaught RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded

Why is a stack overflow happening here?


Here is a codepen illustrating the issue (jsfiddle crashes).

When asking in the JSRoom Zirak found out that the magic number is 3913 blocks on chrome and 2555 on Firefox.

What is being pushed to the stack? Why?


(*) I've checked and it also happens in IE and Firefox

Update: I've checked and unreliably IE is able to avoid the stack overflow exception. It has thrown it two times but not the third. If any of the readers have IE and are willing to test older versions of it too (like IE8 and 9) and let me know what happens I'd really appreciate that.

share|improve this question
3  
@faffaffaff Why does it create a stack frame as it's not a possible scope ? – Denys Séguret Jun 25 '13 at 20:00
4  
@faffaffaff Javascript doesn't have block scope. – Paulpro Jun 25 '13 at 20:00
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@Paulpro That's almost correct. JavaScript does have block scope, but only in try/catch and with. Which are not the case here – Benjamin Gruenbaum Jun 25 '13 at 20:02
2  
If you pass enough expressions to the comma operator, you also get a Stack Overflow error (see codepen.io/anon/pen/cHIga). Something tells me the cause is the same. – bfavaretto Jun 25 '13 at 20:14
4  
Just compiled the code using v8, using the disassembler, and it's clearly not about execution. I got the RangeError exception, during the compilation (probably the parsing). This confirms ghord's answer. – Florian Margaine Jun 25 '13 at 20:27
up vote 17 down vote accepted

First of all, ghord is completely correct. It is caused by the parser's recursive nature, so give him upvote love. But proof needs to be had, and OP wanted me to post this as a separate answer.

Firefox

So, where to find out about how it was done? Ask some guys who're in the engine making. So I went over to the #jsapi channel on irc://irc.mozilla.org and asked them:

< bhackett> zirak: well, with a recursive descent parser all the productions will roughly correspond to a frame on the C stack

< bhackett> zirak: the parser is at js/src/frontent/Parser.cpp

< Waldo> zirak: Parser<ParseHandler>::statement(bool canHaveDirectives) and Parser<ParseHandler>::statements() pretty much

< bhackett> zirak: in this case, the recursion will be Parser::blockStatement ->Parser::statements -> Parser::statement -> Parser::blockStatement

Which is pretty much the answer. Going to the mozilla-central repository and digging in, we have our suspects:

So, what we have is this:

  • statements which calls blockStatement, which parses the block, to find another block, calling
    • statements which calls blockStatement, which parses the block, to find another block, calling
      • statements which calls blockStatement, which parses the block, to find another block, calling
        • ...

Until the stack collapses, I'm guessing here.

So we have the source for Firefox.

Chrome/Chromium/anything else based on v8

Learning my lesson from Firefox, I went to the v8 project and looked for a file named parser. Sure enough, it was there!

The next thing was looking for when a block is parsed, so I naively searched for statements, arriving on the promising ParseStatement.

And it's our lucky day, a giant switch! And the first case is what we care about, a call to ParseBlock, another promising name!

Indeed, inside ParseBlock, we find a call to ParseStatement. So, to be clear, we have two functions:

And they're calling each other like we saw in Firefox:

  • ParseStatement which calls ParseBlock, which parses the block, to find another block, calling
    • ParseStatement which calls ParseBlock, which parses the block, to find another block, calling
      • ParseStatement which calls ParseBlock, which parses the block, to find another block, calling
        • ...

Until kaboom goes the stack.

Safari

(Sorry for calling it closed-source in the last edit!) Safari's js engine is JavaScriptCore, which resides in the WebKit project. Finding the functions was pretty much the same as finding them for Chrome, so let's skip to the interesting part:

We have an extra function in the middle, but the principle is the same:

  • parseSourceElements which calls parseStatement which calls parseBlockStatement, which parses the block, to find another block, calling
    • parseSourceElements which calls parseStatement which calls parseBlockStatement, which parses the block, to find another block, calling
      • parseSourceElements which calls parseStatement which calls parseBlockStatement, which parses the block, to find another block, calling
        • ...

BOOM

IE (and all other closed-source, like Opera)

...will remain a mystery, unless they feel the sudden urge to open their source or if an enterprising employee shared the internals with us. The two great engines above do it in the same fashion, so we can assume the other browsers do it similarly.

If a browser doesn't collapse, that's an interesting question, but one that this answer can't hope to cough answer.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice find. I wonder why they don't just incorporate a count/sleep/escape remedy? I have an object parser in a C++ service I made for WinXP long ago, I just simply kept count of how deep it went, when it went to far i began incorporating a sleep and when the sleep was over bearing (in other words, this parsing was taking more than 60 seconds) i escaped with a clean value of what was parsed, saved the unparsed portion to a repository variable making it loadable for parsing on user command. Seems like they should have already "been there/done that" without incident. – SpYk3HH Jun 25 '13 at 21:14
1  
@SpYk3HH I guess because this is such an edge case, they didn't bother incorporating fancy techniques to avoid it. I vaguely recall seeing, somewhere in the webkit source, how they simply give up if a page has more than a thousand nested tables. – Zirak Jun 25 '13 at 21:19
    
It's always the little things that the "creators" overlook that become the big "gotchyas" to us "coder-monkeys". lol – SpYk3HH Jun 25 '13 at 21:20

Default implementation of Recursive descend parser while simple and elegant, parses every language grammar rule with one method. These methods call other methods recursively, so when you have too much nested rules, it exceeds the stack size. Chrome and Firefox both use such implementation of interpreter.

You will notice that a lot of ' + ', while having nothing to do with scope, will cause the same exception:

+ + + + + + + + + ... // same error
share|improve this answer
    
codepen.io/anon/pen/hpClk Are you sure of that? This is over 50000 + operators - no stack overflow error. – Benjamin Gruenbaum Jun 25 '13 at 20:21
1  
Correct arithmetic with constants is much easier to parse inline. Try it with var b = 1 instead of 1, it throws too. – ghord Jun 25 '13 at 20:29
    
@bfavaretto You got a +1 from me :) This sounds like a reasonable guess, however I'm having trouble accepting it since it takes no roots in the actual code. What functions in the V8 or SpiderMonkey code cause this and why? – Benjamin Gruenbaum Jun 25 '13 at 20:32
3  
+1 It's interesting that a StackOverflow while compiling is indistinguishable from a StackOverflow during execution by the reported error message. – Paulpro Jun 25 '13 at 20:36
1  
@BenjaminGruenbaum You can see some mentions of this here – ghord Jun 25 '13 at 20:36

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