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I want to create a program that gives a random 24 digit number. I have tried different ways but I can't figure out how to make it. An example response would be 392834756843456012349538, which is just a random twenty four digit number.

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The easiest way that comes to my mind is generate 24 numbers between 0 and 9 and concatenate them –  Marco Forberg Jun 25 '13 at 20:05
    
What different ways have you tried? –  Achrome Jun 25 '13 at 20:07
    
A 24 digit number or 24 digits? –  Ziyao Wei Jun 25 '13 at 20:07
    
What about leading zeroes? –  jlordo Jun 25 '13 at 20:13
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5 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

See How to generate a random BigInteger value in Java? where code is provided which does generate a BigInteger random number not greater than n:

BigInteger r;
do {
    r = new BigInteger(n.bitLength(), rnd);
} while (r.compareTo(n) >= 0);
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Here's the easiest way I can think of:

@Test
public void random24Numbers() {
    String random = RandomStringUtils.random(24, false, true);
    System.out.println(random);
}

This uses RandomStringUtils.random. The first parameter is the length, the second says, "no letters". The third says, "give me numbers". Here's an example output:

564266161898194666197908

Yes, it's a String, but I'm going to assume you know how to convert a String into a number.

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What's that got to do with my answer? I think you put this comment on the wrong answer. –  tieTYT Jun 25 '13 at 20:28
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This sample works for generating numbers of 'digits' length including leading zeros and doesn't require any external jar files.

private String generateInt(int digits) {
    StringBuilder str = new StringBuilder();
    Random random = new Random();
    for(int i = 0; i < digits; i++) {
        str.append(random.nextInt(10));
    }
    return str.toString();
}

An example response would be:

081140561664657769754888
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The following uses only core java.lang stuff and seems to get the job done. As in other solutions, the result is a string rather than a java numeric type because none of the basic java datatypes can store 23-digit decimal numbers.

import java.lang.Math;
import java.lang.StringBuilder;

public class random24 {
    static char digits[] = {'0','1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9'};

    public static char randomDecimalDigit() {
        return digits[(int)Math.floor(Math.random() * 10)];
    }

    public static String randomDecimalString(int ndigits) {
        StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder();
        for(int i=0; i<ndigits; i++) {
            result.append(randomDecimalDigit());
        }
        return result.toString();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(randomDecimalString(24));
    }
}
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cant with this code ... :/ –  Stefan Rafa Jun 25 '13 at 20:30
    
showing me error on line static char digits[] = {'0','1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9'}; –  Stefan Rafa Jun 26 '13 at 11:35
    
weird. Admittedly I'm building with an oldish jdk, openjdk-6-jdk 6b20-1.9.13-0ubuntu1~10.04.1 on Ubuntu 10.04 LTS, but I even re-checked the code above cut&pasted to a fresh file. –  Jeff Epler Jun 26 '13 at 12:54
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int[] randomNumbers = new int[24];

for(int i = 0; i < 24; i++) {

    randomNumbers[i] = (int)Math.floor(Math.random() * 10);
    System.out.println(randomNumbers[i]);

}

Added in response to the comment below, code to set a label with this random number sequence:

String randomString = "";

for(int i = 0; i < 24; i++) {

    randomString = randomString.concat(String.valueOf((int)Math.floor(Math.random() * 10)));

}

NumbersLabel.setText(randomString);
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this code is working but when im trying to change the System.out.println(); method with NumbersLabel.setText(""+randomNumbers[i]); the code still working but its just showing one number in the label :/ –  Stefan Rafa Jun 26 '13 at 11:30
    
That is because you will only be setting the label to whichever number is at position i in the integer array. This requirement was not part of your original question, but I will add to the code above to help you out. –  MaxAlexander Jun 26 '13 at 11:37
    
sorry about my bad English but this still doesn't work just working when ill add a text into randomString = "asd(for example)"; and showing me "asd" in the textField –  Stefan Rafa Jun 26 '13 at 11:52
    
Oops, made a rookie error and forgot about immutable Strings. Try the updated code. –  MaxAlexander Jun 26 '13 at 12:27
    
Thanks working ! :) –  Stefan Rafa Jun 26 '13 at 13:04
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