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#include <unordered_map>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <utility>

int main() 
{
  std::unordered_map<string, int> hash {{"a", 1}, {"b", 2}, {"c", 3}};

  // CaseA(NO-ERROR)
  std::for_each(hash.begin(), hash.end(),
    [](const std::pair<string, int>& p) {
      std::cout << p.first << " => " << p.second << endl;
    }
  );

  // CaseB(NO-ERROR)
  std::for_each(hash.begin(), hash.end(),
    [](const std::pair<string, int> p) {
      std::cout << p.first << " => " << p.second << endl;
    }
  );

  // CaseC(NO-ERROR)
  std::for_each(hash.begin(), hash.end(),
    [](std::pair<string, int> p) {
      std::cout << p.first << " => " << p.second << endl;
    }
  );

  // CaseD(ERROR)
  std::for_each(hash.begin(), hash.end(),
    [](std::pair<string, int>& p) {
      std::cout << p.first << " => " << p.second << endl;
    }
  );

}

Q1> Why CaseD is wrong?

Q2> Is it true that CaseA is the recommended way?

Thank you

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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The value_type for a std::unordered_map<K,V> is std::pair<const K,V> (note the const). You cannot bind a reference of type std::pair<K,V> to an object of type std::pair<const K,V>. You should use std::unordered_map<K,V>::value_type instead of trying to spell the name of the type directly, as that will make sure that you don't get it wrong.

In case you wonder, case C works as there is a constructor that enables the conversion of the types, so that p will be a copy of the value in the std::unordered_map.

The recommended way for a lambda that is not meant to modify the elements in the container would be:

[](const std::unordered_map<std::string,int>::value_type& p)

In the first 3 cases in the question a copy of the element is done (performance hit). From the point of view of the caller, cases B and C are the same (in a function, the top level qualifier is dropped), but from the point of view of the definition of the lambda case B will ensure that you don't attempt to modify the argument (which is itself a copy of the source)

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In his case, he likely wants std::unordered_map<K,V>::value_type &, to avoid copies –  Dave S Jun 25 '13 at 20:23
1  
@DaveS: Most probably const std::unordered_map<K,V>::value_type& to avoid copies and inhibit erroneously modifying the contents of the container –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 25 '13 at 20:24
    
Q1> In general, is it true that the passed-in parameter to lambda expression is the Container::value_type? Q2> "In the first 3 cases in the question a copy of the element is done ". Is it because that I use pair<std::string,int> instead of pair<const std::string, int>? –  q0987 Jun 25 '13 at 20:35
    
don't you need const typename std::unordered_map<std::string,int>::value_type& p here? –  Walter Jun 25 '13 at 20:39
1  
@q0987: Q1> lambdas have many uses, in this particular case where you want to apply the lambda to the elements in a container value_type is the type of those elements. Q2> Yes, the copy in case A is done because the types don't match, and that means that the reference in the lambda argument cannot be bound to the element, so it must copy and then bind the reference (in cases B and C the copy is there because you pass by value). –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 25 '13 at 21:22

Your problem is that your container is full of std::pair<const string, int>. For case 1 through 3, the std::pair<const string, int> in the container can be converted to a std::pair<string, int> implicitly, and then that temporary passed to your lambda.

The recommended way in C++11 to do something non-mutating for each element of a container is:

for( auto const& p: hash ) {
  std::cout << p.first << " => " << p.second << endl;
}

which is less verbose, and doesn't violate DRY. Prefer container-based iteration instead of iterator-based iteration when it makes sense.

Between container-based std:: algorithms and auto typed lambdas, using the std:: algorithms is going to become more tempting again in a version or two of C++. Even then, unless you are abstracting over the kind of algorithm you are using your lambda on, for_each is now quite questionable, because we have a first-class language feature that does what for_each does.

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