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I am getting a taste of Scala through the artima "Programming in Scala" book.

While presenting the Map traits, the authors go to some lengths to describe the -> syntax as a method that can be applied to any type to get a tuple.

And indeed:

scala> (2->"two")
res1: (Int, String) = (2,two)

scala> (2,"two")
res2: (Int, String) = (2,two)

scala> (2->"two") == (2, "two")
res3: Boolean = true

But those are not equivalent:

scala> Map(1->"one") + (2->"two")
res4: scala.collection.immutable.Map[Int,String] = Map(1 -> one, 2 -> two)

scala> Map(1->"one") + (2, "two")
<console>:8: error: type mismatch; 
found   : Int(2)
required: (Int, ?)
             Map(1->"one") + (2, "two")

Why is this so, since my first tests seem to show that both "pair" syntaxes build a tuple?

Regards.

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3  
In fact they are equivalent: (2->"two") is analog to ((2, "two")) and Map(1 -> "one") + ((2, "two")) works just fine. Map(1 -> "one") + 2 -> "two" wont work with the same error as Map(1->"one") + (2, "two") –  om-nom-nom Jun 25 '13 at 21:07
    
Could you restate this as an answer so that I can accept it? :) –  oparisy Jun 25 '13 at 21:16
    
you could accept Rex answer although it will be good to mention why map + 2 -> "two" doesn't work (unfortunately, I don't know). –  om-nom-nom Jun 25 '13 at 21:19
1  
@om-nom-nom - Well, I do know that one. –  Rex Kerr Jun 25 '13 at 21:21
1  
@om-nom-nom map + 2 -> "two" will give you (map + 2) -> "two": + and -> have same precedence and are left-associative. –  gzm0 Jun 25 '13 at 21:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

They are exactly the same, thanks to this class in Predef (only partly reproduced here):

final class ArrowAssoc[A](val __leftOfArrow: A) extends AnyVal {
  @inline def -> [B](y: B): Tuple2[A, B] = Tuple2(__leftOfArrow, y)
}
@inline implicit def any2ArrowAssoc[A](x: A): ArrowAssoc[A] = new ArrowAssoc(x)

So now the question is when will (a,b) syntax be ambiguous where (a -> b) is not? And the answer is in function calls, especially when they're overloaded:

def f[A](a: A) = a.toString
def f[A,B](a: A, b: B) = a.hashCode + b.hashCode
f(1,2)     // Int = 3
f(1 -> 2)  // String = (1,2)
f((1, 2))  // String = (1,2)

Map + in particular gets confused because it's overloaded with a multiple-argument version, so you could

Map(1 -> 2) + (3 -> 4, 4 -> 5, 5 -> 6)

and it thus interprets

Map(1 -> 2) + (3, 4)

as trying to add both 3 to the map, and then 4 to the map. Which of course makes no sense, but it doesn't try the other interpretation.

With -> there is no such ambiguity.

However, you can't

Map(1 -> 2) + 3 -> 4

because + and - have the same precedence. Thus it is interpreted as

(Map(1 -> 2) + 3) -> 4

which again fails because you're trying to add 3 in place of a key-value pair.

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Thanks for explaining why the parens are required, as suggested by @om-nom-nom. –  oparisy Jun 25 '13 at 21:24

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